All posts by Pat

Patricia Furstenberg is a skilled and diverse author, poetess and mother, known for her uplifting, charming themes and lovable, enchanting characters: dogs, cats, elephants, cheetahs, lions, but also squirrels and snails. Her words “truly make the world a happier and more beautiful place!” Her book "Joyful Trouble" is an Amazon Bestseller. Her book of poems "As Good As Gold" became a #1 New Release the day it was published. With a medical degree behind her, Patricia is passionate about mind, brain and education and the psychology behind it. Using her knowledge she crafts stories and poems that are great fun, as well as teaching empathy. Her stories are filled with “creativity and vivid imagery” and she knows how to “capture the reader’s imagination.” Her prolific writing is described as: positive, diverse, crisp, joyful and uplifting. Patricia Furstenberg came to writing though reading, her passion for books being something she inherited from her parents. As a winner of the Write Your Own Christie Competition, the Judges "were impressed by her thorough investigation and admired the strength of her narrative; they were impressed by her style”. The judges thought Patricia's writing style is "well structured, with a great sense of tension and suspense”, “confident and intriguing”. The Judges were Mathew Prichard, David Brawn from Harper Collins UK and Daniel Mallory from Harper Collins US. When she’s not writing Patricia likes to read, read, read and dance. She never counts how many cups of coffee she enjoys in a day. Between her books you can also enjoy: "The Cheetah and the Dog", "Puppy, 12 Months of Rhymes and Smiles", "The Elephant and the Sheep" and many others. She is a Huffington Post contributor.

Mind-Brain-Education Secrets: Strategies to Benefit Students and Teachers #MBE #mind #brain #education #educhat #knowledge #strategy #students via @PatFurstenberg

Mind-Brain-Education Secrets:  Strategies to Benefit Students and Teachers

1. What is Mind-Brain-Education (MBE)?

MBE is a young science started at Harvard University 25 years ago by uniting the fields of neuroscience, psychology and education. MBE brings together cognitive neuroscience (studying of the mind and its processes), behavioral science (studying the interactions among different organisms in the world) and professionals in the education field. MBE takes the latest discoveries in brain science and applies them in education, revealing new, more appropriate teaching methods lined up with the latest studies and the demands of the 21st century.

2. Why is MBE important to me, a parent, teacher or student?

The human brain, the most complex organ in the human body, is the centre of our nervous system. We need our not only brain to move, make use of our senses or regulate the functions of our body but also to speak, think, learn, and interact with the world around us.

Let’s think of the brain as the engine of a car. By understanding the basic aspects of engineering we can reduce its fuel consumption, saving money and lengthening the life of our car.

Understanding how the brain develops and functions we can learn how to better make use of its massive power.

The development of the human brain follows a natural, biological process yet it constantly changes, developing and adapting to our experiences, be it emotional, physical or educational. So not only does the educator needs to teach content, but he also has to be mindful of the ways in which he teaches and use subject-tailored methods to ensure a better educational outcome.

Understanding why each individual’s brain is unique means that we understand that each one’s brain develops at its own pace and that teaching can and should be tailored to individual needs.

The concept of brain plasticity is vital to grasp as well. The brain’s plasticity means that our brains are permanently remodeling themselves by cutting old, unused neural pathways and strengthening new ones, reinforced through practice. This is a fantastic trait of our brains; understanding its mechanism and how to make the most of it can have positive, long lasting effects on individual’s education and long term life goals.

Understanding how the human brain evolves from birth through childhood, teen years and going on throughout our lives, allow teachers to prioritize and plan the educational curriculum accordingly. This is crucial in aiding students to focus in class and in developing effective, intelligent methods that help them remember more information, easier.

Analogical reasoning, or considering the ways in which two ideas are related, is the way in which our brains make sense of new concepts, by explaining them based on what we already know, connecting and comparing new information to old one. A classic example of analogy reasoning is comparing the structure of an atom with the solar system:

“The nucleus is the sun and electrons are the planets revolving around their sun.”

Relational thinking means finding meaningful patterns in new situations and using this to make a decision, for example a physician correcting his diagnosis by taking into consideration the abnormal symptoms displayed by his patient. The bases and neural pathways for analogical and relational thinking are laid during childhood and until adolescence and they are crucial skills needed by the 21st century work force.

3. How do I use the MBE knowledge?

Understanding how our brains differ from one person to another based on our genes, personal abilities and the context of our upbringing is an important factor to consider in the 21st century educational field.

Although MBE is still a very young science, it is vital to understand that brain science, psychology and education are strongly interrelated and that modern, 21st century education cannot happen without 21st century psychology on one side and 21st century brain science on the other side. MBE shines a spotlight on the uniqueness of each individual’s brain, on how its biological mechanisms influence how we learn and that our past experiences and the environment also affect our brain’s development and learning. MBE helps us understand how powerful our brain is, how much we can actually do with it and how we can better use it to our advantage.

Using the MBE knowledge might not bring a change or show improvement overnight. As with any cognitive skill, it takes time and practice as well as a clear idea of the desired outcome.

The knowledge MBE reveals can be used in:

  • helping to develop the critical cognitive skills needed by Generation Z;
  • understanding the brain-based causes of different learning disabilities such as dyslexia and how to apply the latest research in identifying these children at an early stage and helping them achieve their best in school by providing them with the necessary cognitive and educational support ;
  • understanding that, although we all have genetic predispositions and abilities, these have little to do with our success as a learner. With the right support, stimulation and a suitable learning environment even a modest background can be maximized beyond expectations;
  • preparing graduates in this new work field, with US Universities already offering master’s degrees and a doctoral programme in MBE. There are also short term study alternatives available. In Africa, the First Mind-Brain and Education Seminar already took place.

4. How is MBE different than what we knew about education before?

We know that the best time to learn is when the brain and the nervous system are still maturing during childhood and through the teenage years. MBE shines a light on the importance of the school curriculum as well as the methods of teaching. MBE explains why laying down the physical wiring (neural connections) during the formative years will only benefit the young generation later on when such neural connections, already in place, need only be reinforced. For example in the relational thinking field when the neural pathways and connections formed in the brain are laid out during the formative years, before adolescence.

21st century jobs require novel skills. We work less with our hands and more with our brains while being required to learn and remember more and more information. MBE can help us better accumulate this information, integrating it and manage its volume, filtering and remembering it. Here is where we understand why good analogical and relational thinking skills play such an important role, more than ever before in the history of human education.

5. How can MBE help you acquire a 21st century job?

We all agree that in order to succeed in the 21st century student’s knowledge must now go beyond the “three Rs” (“reading, writing, and ‘rithmetic”.and basic computer literacy. No student in the history of education has ever needed to cover such a multifaceted array of topics.

Chances are that in your family or at your office there are at least four generations present, working side-by-side. But different generations of employees will have different motivations and would have required different skills when they first entered the workforce.

Mind brain education - Comparison of qualities, values, qualifications of different generations, Patricia Furstenberg
Mind brain education – Comparison of qualities, values, qualifications of different generations, Patricia Furstenberg

According to Global Digital Citizen and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, OECD, the most important 21st-century skills students will need are:

  • Problem Solving
  • Creativity / Innovation
  • Analytic Thinking
  • Collaboration / Team work
  • Oral and Written Communication
  • Ethics, Action, and Accountability
  • Diversity (global thinking and global citizens)
  • Information Technology Application
  • Leadership
  • Lifelong learning / Self Direction
  • Social Responsibility

Only innovation in the classroom will help students gain these 21st century skills and MBE can provide educators, parents and students with the knowledge and the tools on how to acquire them. There is still a huge gap between the skills required by 21st century companies and the skills taught in schools. This gap exists because technology evolves in leaps, becoming challenging to keep up with while incorporating it in the school curriculum. This is why teaching students how to learn, how to accumulate information in a proficient way and how to make the most of the power that the human brain has will equip them with the basics needed to face the challenges of a 21st century work field.

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Are You a Puppy or Dog? a #humorous #poem #AsGoodAsGold via @PatFurstenberg

Are You a Puppy or Dog?

~A humorous poem  for pet lovers and not only! Read more poetry in my new book As Good As Gold~

A puppy is needy,

He’s cuddly, yet squeaky,

His eyes are beady,

He is small.

He needs his cuddles,

Preferably in bundles

For he loves to snuggle

All night long.

 

A puppy has questions,

Runs away from lessons,

Jumps in all directions,

Yet he always

Looks for mom.

 

A puppy’s intentions

Can always be questioned

Although are the best ones,

Or so he says.

 

A dog has learned his lessons,

And he’s been called a blessing

More than once.

A dog knows that the present

Is the blessing

He’s been looking for

All along.

 

And so I ask you,

Between the two

What came first,

Puppy or dog?

 

For a puppy needs his mommy

And a dog grew up from a puppy

Or when else

Had he learned

That the present is gold?

~~~~~

You might also like to read the poem Bailey the Sea Dog , a haiku for an Airedale Terrier dog or read about Understanding your child’s affinity towards animals.

Enjoy more haiku and feel good, humorous poems about dogs in my new book of poetry and haiku, As Good AS Gold:

As Good As Gold is also available as e-book, paperback and Large Print, a dyslexia friendly edition: Amazon UK, Amazon US 

 

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Pets — Understanding Your Child’s Affinity Towards Animals via @PatFurstenberg

Pets — Understanding Your Child’s Affinity Towards Animals

How does a child react when interacting with an animal? Smiling, the entire body filled with enthusiasm and exhilaration? Small fingers enjoying and learning from the experience of touching the pet’s fur? Watchful eyes fixed on the animal and, you just know it, questions about to start pouring?

Or perhaps a child may close his eyes to feel the pet he is holding, to become one with it… “I am a horse…” “I am a rabbit…” “I am a lion cub on the African plains…” “I am alive!” Children, just like animals, live in the present; where the heart pulsates and the wind is fragrant, if only you pay attention.

When a child meets an animal, there is a much stronger connection that takes place. It goes beyond the sensory or the visual stimulation of touching and observing. For a child, being in the company of an animal is more significant than the educational lesson adults want them to take from it.

A biological connection is already in place when a child and an animal meet. Be it an animal or an insect, just by being different to us, they a child’s attention –– in most cases, to stir his or her caring and nurturing instinct. Children have it in their hearts: the empathy, the understanding that what is small needs to be protected, as well as the desire and the need to look after it and nurture it.

As Kahlil Gibran put it, “Your children are not your children; they are the sons and daughters of life’s longing for itself.”

Human’s interest in animals is wired into our DNA.

Biophilia” was defined in 1984 by E.O.Wilson as “the innate tendency [in human beings] to focus on life and lifelike process. To an extent still undervalued in philosophy and religion, our existence depends on this propensity, our spirit is woven from it, hopes rises on its currents”. The disposition towards nature and the living is prominent in youngsters. Children flourish when they are outdoors, especially when interacting with living animals.

Children value creatures for what they really are, alive. A kid connects with a ladybird just as well as she bonds with a kitten or a horse. When we take our children to the zoo, the link (unseen, between children and animals) is already in place.

The invisible wire is what keeps our youngster glued to the cage of an elephant, or the aquarium and its penguins. The child has “seen” more than the animal in its natural habitat. He treasures and celebrates having met another living being. And this moment often becomes one of a child’s most treasured memories.

What is different from us should and can be treasured, just because it is puzzling and thrilling and, at the same time, stimulating.

Think about how much children enjoy stories about animals. Why is that? Wild animals live in “shelters” that are different from ours, and which they build themselves! Animals find their own, food and it is often strange-looking and so different from ours. Animals can do so many other things we haven’t seen any human being doing. Animals choose their own special lives, and we are but blessed to be a part of them –– to observe and enjoy them.

If this is not enough, there is also an added benefit to children’s natural bond with living things. Studies show that when a child’s innate love and care towards nature is being nurtured and encouraged, it not only fuels the child’s inner desire to learn, but in the long run, it develops the child emotionally.

Children who are understood and encouraged to care for animals will grow into thoughtful adults with a higher EQ (Emotional Quotient). An individual with a high EQ will be better able to recognise and express their own emotions, as well as the emotions of those around them. They will be able to easily put them into words and analyse them, then react in consequence –– a vital task in improving our social skills and, by extension, the social welfare of each generation.

Initially published on the Huffington Post SA on 5 November 2017

You might also like to read:

Haiku-San, Silver Birds

How To Raise A Child With A High IQ

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Haiku-San, Airedale Terrier, #Haiku #Sunday #HaikuSan via @PatFurstenberg

Airedale Terrier, a Sunday Haiku: Haiku-San

Watchful behind curls,

A tight spring of bouncy barks

Airedale Terrier.

~~~~~

You might also like to read the poem Bailey the Sea Dog.

Enjoy more Haiku about dogs in my new book of poetry and haiku, As Good AS Gold:

I‘ve really enjoyed reading this collection of poems. Pat has found just the right voice for the puppy and his adventures. Has been a great comfort to me” (5* Amazon Review)

This is a fine selection of puppy poems” (5* Amazon Review)

As Good As Gold is also available in e-book, paperback and Large Print, colorful pictures, a dyslexia friendly edition: get it on Amazon UK, Amazon US 

I chose the name Haiku-San as it derives from Haiku, meaning unusual verse in Japanese (hai=unusual, ku=verse, strophe) and San, the honorific

Japanese title when speaking about people. San is also the phonetic transcription of the first syllable of the English word Sunday, Sun-day hence Haiku-San, a Sunday feature on Alluring Creations involving Haiku I write.

Text and Haiku-San © Patricia Furstenberg.

(Image free on Pixabay)

I hope you enjoyed my haiku. Let me know your thoughts in comment below.

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What the World Cup and Wimbledon Finals, Barack Obama’s Visit to South Africa and Mandela’s Centenary Have Taught Me, #WorldCup #Wimbledon #Obama #Mandela #SA #lessons #tolerance #motivation

What the World Cup and Wimbledon Finals, Barack Obama’s Visit to South Africa and Mandela’s Centenary Have Taught Me

Middle of July is packed with world class sporting and political events. Russia hosted the 2018 FIFA World Cup, South African Kevin Anderson qualified in the Wimbledon 2018 Men’s Single Final (last time South Africa came this far was 97 years ago, Brian Norton in 1921), and former US president Barak Obama will deliver the 2018 Nelson Mandela Annual Lecture, marking the Centenary of Madiba’s birth.

For me, in the FIFA World Cup 2018 the ball really began to roll in the Quarter-finals, with Belgium winning against Brazil 2-1 and Croatia winning on penalties 4-3 against Russia. Then, surprisingly or not, England lost 2-1 against Croatia in the semi-finals.

England’s lost against Croatia taught me that:

Even if you loose, you still achieved so much more simply by participating.

“‘It doesn’t matter that England lost. They came fourth out of all the countries in the world’“:

And that the journey is more important that the destination:

“Just a reminder that England lasted longer than… Germany, Argentina, Portugal, Spain, Brazil, Uruguay, Belgium “:


I was touched by the thank you’s pouring from both sides (fans and team) as a result of The Three Lions’s journey through the Fifa World Cup.

Always remember to thank your supporters, no matter of their numbers or where they might be.

Don’t be afraid to dream.

“To everyone who supported us. To everyone who believed this time was different. To everyone who wasn’t afraid to dream. To everyone who knows this is only the beginning. Thank you. We hope we made you proud.”:

It was touching to hear the English fans singing Oasis as they left the World Cup. That’s the spirit, England!

Pain is easier to endure if shared:

Lessons learned form the Croatian National Soccer Team and their supporters:

To me, the Croatian National Soccer Team was the underdog of the 2018 Fifa World Cup. Their dribbling techniques, sportsmanship, FAIR PLAY and team spirit are equal to none.

Plus they have these amazing supporters.

These Croatian Firefighters have entered in history as they just miss the penalty win for Croatia as Duty calls:

At the end 2018 Fifa Final, when Croatia lost 4-2 against France, the Croatian President Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović stood in the rain, without any umbrella, to congratulate, hug and wipe the tears of the Croatian soccer players, showing her support, admiration and appreciation towards their outstanding game.

No matter what you do, you will draw strength from your support team. Make sure you have one.

Because at the end of the day…

it matters what you feel in your heart:

From Wimbledon’s Men’s Single Final there was a lot to learn on fair play, on being humble and on how to graciously accept defeat. The words of South African tennis player Kevin Anderson express all this:


Kevin Anderson also teaches us a great lesson on
giving back and remembering one’s roots:

“It means so much for me to have played in the @Wimbledon final. There are so many positives and great memories I will be taking with me. Thanks to everyone from South Africa and around the world for your support and messages”:

and on endurance and perseverance:

On Barack Obama’s visit to South Africa, to deliver the 2018 Nelson Mandela Annual Lecture – celebrating the centenary of Madiba’s birth.

“A winner is a dreamer who never gives up” (Nelson Mandela)

There is a lot to be said about the Nelson Mandela’s legacy, teaching us that change for the better is always possible, never give up hope.

“Even when the odds are long and the times are dark, change is always possible. But only if we’re willing to work for it and fight for it.” @MichelleObama’s message to gathered in South Africa this week:


Certainly history in the making: pay attention and remember.

LIVE STREAM 16th Nelson Mandela Annual Lecture by Barack Obama, 17 July 2018:


Former US president Barack Obama will deliver the Mandela lecture in Johannesburg on Tuesday, the 17th of July, with 15 000 people expected to attend.

“It’s not about who we like but what we are trying to address in a particular moment and the audience that we are talking to.”(The Mandela Foundation’s chief executive, Sello Hatang)

Barack Obama will inaugurate his most significant international project as an ex-president, with an announcement on Monday that the Obama Foundation plans to convene 200 young people this July in Johannesburg for five days of meetings, workshops and technical training. (The New York Times) Also, Obama’s visit to South Africa:

“It gives him an opportunity to lift up a message of tolerance, inclusivity and democracy at a time when there are obviously challenges to Mandela’s legacy around the world,” (Benjamin J. Rhodes, a former speechwriter for Obama who still advises him.)

“There’s an enhanced sense of tribalism in the world,” he said. “Our unifying theory is that the best way to promote inclusive and democratic societies is by empowering young people in civil society.”

“No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin or his background or his religion…”(Barack Obama)

What a lesson on tolerance.

You might also like to read:

The 5 Lessons I Learned From Madiba

Keep Your Faith South Africa

 

 

 

 

 

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Haiku-San, Running Water, #Haiku #Sunday #HaikuSan via @PatFurstenberg

Running Water, a Sunday Haiku: Haiku-San

Where to, little stream?

Rushing, gushing over stones.

Life is here and now.

~~~~~

I chose the name Haiku-San as it derives from Haiku, meaning unusual verse in Japanese (hai=unusual, ku=verse, strophe) and San, the honorific Japanese title when speaking about people. San is also the phonetic transcription of the first syllable of the English word Sunday, Sun-day hence Haiku-San, a Sunday feature on Alluring Creations involving Haiku I write.

You can find more Haiku in my new book of poetry, As Good AS Gold:

a lovely book. I think it would appeal to children and adults alikeShort Book And Scribes

this book of poems is such a pleasure to readBooks Are My Cwtches

As Good As Gold is also available in Large Print, a dyslexia friendly edition:

Amazon UK, Amazon US 

Text and Haiku-San © Patricia Furstenberg.

(Image courtesy Daniil Silantev @betagamma, Unsplash)

I hope you enjoyed my haiku. Let me know your thoughts in comment below.

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Haiku-San, Tree, #Haiku #Sunday #HaikuSan via @PatFurstenberg

Tree, a Sunday Haiku: Haiku-San

Up, slender and bare

Lonely trees always stand tall

Prayers to the sky.

~~~~~

 

I chose the name Haiku-San as it derives from Haiku, meaning unusual verse in Japanese (hai=unusual, ku=verse, strophe) and San, the honorific Japanese title when speaking about people. San is also the phonetic transcription of the first syllable of the English word Sunday, Sun-day hence Haiku-San, a Sunday feature on Alluring Creations involving Haiku I enjoy writing.

You can find more Haiku in my new book of poetry, As Good AS Gold:

Haikus at the end were tiny diamonds.” (Kathryn Meyer Griffith, long time author)

Whilst this book is suitable for younger readers, I’m pretty certain that a lot of adults will enjoy this too. I certainly did! ” (Good’n Ready)

Text and Haiku-San © Patricia Furstenberg.

(Image courtesy Erol Ahmed Pixabay)

I hope you enjoyed my haiku. Let me know your thoughts in comment below.

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As Good as Gold Blog Tour, a Success #AsGoodASGold #BlogTour #humour #poetry #haiku #dogs @PatFurstenberg

As Good As Gold by Patricia Furstenberg
As Good As Gold by Patricia Furstenberg

My new book As Good as Gold, A dog’s life in poems was released just a few weeks ago as eBook and paperback and it enjoyed many wonderful blogger’s attention during a five day powerful and uplifting blog tour.

Here are some of lovely comments As Good as Gold received:

“I have a confession to make. I’m not much of a dog lover. I’m more a cat person so I wasn’t sure if I would enjoy As Good As Gold, celebrating dogs. I needn’t have worried. I thoroughly enjoyed this charming collection of verse and as a result of reading it I think I understand dogs so much better.” @Lindahill50Hill on her blog,Linda’s Book Bag

“Patricia has caught the canine personality beautifully in her poems.” @LoveBooksGroup on Love Books Group blog.

“We enjoyed reading through all the poems and seeing the adorable pup photos with each one.” @J_Mischenkoblogging at Read Rant RockAndRoll

“These are beautiful poems to be read with a child, by a child or as a pet loving adult. There is something for everyone to relate to.” @susanhampson57 on her blog Books From Dusk Till Dawn

“a lovely book. I think it would appeal to any dog lover or animal lover, children and adults alike.” @ShortBookScribe blogging at Short Book And Scribes

“Many people are put off poetry as they find it inaccessible and this is why this book of poems is such a pleasure to read, each one uses words and images we all know.” @Walescrazy on her blog Books Are My Cwtches

“I always enjoy reading Patricia’s books not just because they centre on dogs but because she always manages to capture their personality as they grow and find their way.” @mgriffiths163 for @JenMedBkReviews blogging at JenMedsBookReviews

My favourite poem is “As Pink as a Puppy’s Tongue” because it has a pug in it and pugs are my favourite dog. This is a very good book.” review by a young boy reader at @x2mum on blogmumjd

“I particularly liked the haikus at the end. It’s quite a challenge to write a haiku with its strict rules but the author has managed this beautifully with each a small complete story and still from a puppy’s point of view.” @portybelle ‏ blogging at Portobello Bookblog

“This book is a pure delight to read! It is uplifting, positive and a pleasure to read and as a dog lover it warmed my heart” @dmmaguire391 blogging at Donnasbookblog

“All of these poems are so incredible and I truly hope that readers everywhere will check out this new release by Patricia Furstenberg. She continues to prove herself as an outstanding writer and her words truly make the world a happier and more beautiful place!” @jenthomason1109 on her blog Dandelions Inspired Blog

“I really enjoyed seeing all things from snowflakes and autumn leaves, to other creatures in the garden, through all these dog’s eyes. What we consider normal and everyday for our puppies and our older dogs, may not be so ordinary and normal. Maybe we could learn from the excitement of our dogs, a new “wonder” in all the things around us.”@Haydnsgrammie for @ReviewThisSites at Review This Reviews

this could be easily used in a classroom reading a poem a day and using this as a discussion to talk about feelings and emotions too. Children will love seeing the world through a puppies eyes .@ggilly47on her blog gilly918

“My little girl loves dogs so she really enjoyed listening to the poems as they really were lots of fun and designed to make you smile. Then there is the lovely addition of photos of both dogs and puppies that we both loved” @Rae_Reads1blogging at raereads1.blogspot

“I’d recommend As Good as Gold to fans of poetry and books about dogs in general. It’s a great read for people of all ages.” @pixyjazz on her blog Book Reviews By Jasmine

“The well-written poems with vivid imagery are enjoyable, entertaining, and uplifting. This brilliant poetry book is one that dog-lover parents and their children will not want to miss.” @singlibbooks on her blog Singing Librarian Books

“This is a charming collection of ‘doggy’ verse with an extensive range of other animals and nature included, as well as some delightful haiku at the end.” @JuliaThumWrites blogging at Julia Thum

You can purchase As Good as Gold from Amazon worldwide:

As Good as Gold eBook: Amazon UK, Amazon US, Amazon worldwide

As Good as Gold paperback: Amazon UK, Amazon US, Amazon worldwide

As Good as Gold Large Print and dyslexia friendly: Amazon UK, Amazon US

 

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Haiku-San, Father, #Haiku #Sunday #HaikuSan via @PatFurstenberg

Father, a Sunday Haiku: Haiku-San

Careworn, labored hands,

Troubled, creased, smoothed by love,

A dad’s life in short.

~~~~~

I chose the name Haiku-San as it derives from Haiku, meaning unusual verse in Japanese (hai=unusual, ku=verse, strophe) and San, the honorific Japanese title when speaking about people. San is also the phonetic transcription of the first syllable of the English word Sunday, Sun-day hence Haiku-San, a Sunday feature on Alluring Creations involving Haiku I write.

You can find more Haiku in my new book of poetry, As Good AS Gold:

Haikus at the end were tiny diamonds.” (Kathryn Meyer Griffith, long time author)

“This is a truly delightful and uplifting book of poems through the eyes of mans faith friend and companion, his dog. I often use to look into the eyes of my own dogs and just wonder how they saw the world and well I think Pat Furstenberg has probably come up with the nearest possible answers.” (Susan Hampson)

Text and Haiku-San © Patricia Furstenberg.

(Image courtesy Pixabay)

I hope you enjoyed my haiku. Let me know your thoughts in comment below.

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