Category Archives: languages and translations

Symbolism in Silent Heroes, the Story behind it via @PatFurstenberg #symbolism #fiction #history #writerslife

I still remember attending my first lecture on symbolism . My own studies were as far from literature and art as the moon is from the man who occupies it.

I was studying medical dentistry when a friend and I went to the University of History and Art to attend a lecture on symbolism in art. It was late one evening when we opened the massive door leading to a cosmic-size amphitheater packed with excited faces.

Happiness can be found anywhere. Sometimes you just need to search harder or ask for someone to help you discover it. A US Marine, his MWD, military working dog and Afghan boys.
Happiness can be found anywhere. Sometimes you just need to search harder or ask for someone to help you discover it. A US Marine, his MWD, military working dog and Afghan boys.

Used to look at dead bodies laying on an autopsy table, to squint inside them while trying to discern the shriveled femoral nerve from the already gray artery, I was struck by the excitement short-circuiting everyone attending the lecture and the amount of information hidden in plain view, underneath layers of colorful paint.

I was hooked and, although I may not have earned a degree in art, the keen interest in symbolism has sipped into my pores for good.

Symbology - 'In God we Trust'.  (Army Photographic Competition 2012 - Pro Portfolio winner; Photo by SSgt Nesbit RLC/MoD/Mandatory Credit Crown Copyright via Getty Images)
‘In God we Trust’. (Army Photographic Competition 2012 – Pro Portfolio winner; Photo by SSgt Nesbit RLC/MoD/Mandatory Credit Crown Copyright via Getty Images) These include a simple disk with a cross cut out which he wore with his identity (Dog) tags, and an American coin dated 1988, the year of his birth. The soldier who wanted to remain unidentified carried these with him all the time whilst he served in Afghanistan on Operation Herrick 15 for luck.

Was symbolism introduced in “Silent Heroes” intentionally?

On writing “Silent Heroes” I did not plan to include symbolism. It wasn’t a voluntary act, like research had been, or plotting the outline of the story, building my characters. Including symbolical elements was a work of my sly subconscious mind. It’s been the work of my cerebellum, you can say. Anatomy having its own play over art.

I do not expect readers to pick up on the symbolism used or to interpret it in the same way. I think this is very much connected to how our minds are wired. Some of us see things that others don’t, because they are not important to them. I does not mean that the first group hallucinates, or that the second group is inattentive.

The Purple Sunbird, (Cinnyris asiaticus) is found in the dry zone from the Arabian Peninsula into Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan until the dry zone of Rajasthan and Gujarat.
The Purple Sunbird, (Cinnyris asiaticus) is found in the dry zone from the Arabian Peninsula into Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan until the dry zone of Rajasthan and Gujarat.

Has symbolism in “Silent Heroes” been consciously manipulated at any stage during the writing process?

Now, this would imply that, at some stage during the writing of “Silent Heroes“, I picked up on some symbols introduced in the story-line. Which I did. Once I became conscious of the implications these symbolism will have on the narrative, I kept developing that thread. I did not removed it, since it was introduced organically and not voluntarily.

I felt that if I will remove the symbols, the story will be less rich, the characters, at least some of them, will lose their credibility. And myself, as a writer, will lose the passion for the telling of the story of these “Silent Heroes“, passion that had fueled me for over two years.

A book thrown in the dust.
A book thrown in the dust.

Can other symbols be discovered in “Silent Heroes”?

Other symbols, besides the ones my subconscious mind placed and my conscious mind picked up? I believe so, as I trust the reader’s creative minds as well as the connection I hope they will establish this book.

Lady Tulip - Tulipa clusiana From Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq, Pakistan and the western Himalayas
Lady Tulip – Tulipa clusiana From Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq, Pakistan and the western Himalayas

Is symbolism for real?

Is air real? Is the language we speak real? Is the sky blue? Humans have a innate ability and desire for creating things out of nothing. Buildings out of dust, worlds out of words, art out of dreams.

And humans also need to communicate. Writers communicate through their books. Language itself is a symbolic form of communication. Symbols used by artists, and therefore by writers, are placed – subconsciously or not – to help channel the results of their work. The end product. Much like a painter creating a portrait, an architect, a building that lasts, writers stir their stories using symbols, where appropriate.

The journey a writer takes when creating a book is anchored in his dreams and imagination, but it is stirred by the hidden symbolism which is also a product of his own mind.

A gardener and his garden in Afghanistan. Afghans are avid garners.
A gardener and his garden in Afghanistan. Afghans are avid garners.

Images of symbolism in “Silent Heroes” *****SPOILER ALERT*****

Without spoiling the plot, I will list a few of the symbols I unconsciously introduced in my latest work of fiction “Silent Heroes, When Love and Values Are Worth Fighting for”.

An Afghan butterfly on a soldier's sleeve.
An Afghan butterfly on a soldier’s sleeve.

You do not have to read past this point if you have not read “Silent Heroes” yet. You can have a sneak peek here.

You could skip the very short, last paragraph, and return to it after reading “Silent Heroes”.

Silent Heroes, When Love and Faith Are Worth Fighting for
Silent Heroes, When Love and Faith Are Worth Fighting for

Some of the symbols found in “Silent Heroes” are:

Qala-e-Bost Fortress, Afghanistan
Qala-e-Bost, Afghansitan

The blue bird.

The book in the dust.

Qala-e-Bost Fortress.

Poppy flowers.

The Afghan garden.

What do they symbolize?

I suggest you don’t go past this point if you haven’t read “Silent Heroes” yet. First read the book, then return and see if your thoughts and mine converge.

Symbolism in Silent Heroes
Symbolism in Silent Heroes

To me, the blue bird symbolizes the spirit of Emma’s mother, as well as hope in another chance for happiness. A reminder that hope exists, no matter what situation we find ourselves in.

The book in the dust symbolizes the disrespect for human life and human wrights. Books are a well of wisdom and the product of hard, assiduous work. They don’t belong in the dirt, just like human life does not.

Qala-e-Bost Fortress symbolizes the upright spirit of the Afghan people, still standing after centuries of wars and oppression. And just like the people of Afghanistan, through its architecture, it is deeply rooted in its land, drawing strength from it.

Poppy flowers are both a symbol of the blood spilled in Afghanistan and of the never-ending struggle for survival of the Afghan people. Poppies are extremely resilient, they can grow under harsh weather conditions, although they look so fragile. But poppies are also deadly plants in the sense that farming them caught so many innocent souls in the loop of poverty and addiction.

The Afghan Garden symbolizes Heaven and hope in a land devastated by wars. Just as Heaven transcends all spirits and gods, being present in all religions, all people, no matter of their religion, sex or skin color, are equal in the eyes of God.

Have you discovered other symbols after reading “Silent Heroes“? Tell me about them, I’d love to hear from you.

Silent Heroes by Patricia Furstenberg
Silent Heroes by Patricia Furstenberg

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27 German idioms to display the German’s love for fairy tales and sausages via @PatFurstenberg #idioms #language #translation #German #English

Weather it is Michael Ende’s “The Never Ending Story” (“Die Unendliche Geschichte”), Erich Kästner’s “Emil and the Detectives” (“Emil Und Die Detektive”) or Grimm’s “Hansel and Gretel”, German storytelling reveals a rich culture and a millennial tradition. But did you now that this country produces over 1200 different types of sausages? Surely the opulent German cuisine would have also infiltrated the expressive Teutonic language, as we can see from the following German idioms.

Kein Schwein war da

Translation: There weren’t any pigs there

Meaning: Not worth going, a bad place to be (to understand this idiom you need to keep in mind the German’s love for sausages.

Kein Schwein war da - Not worth going

Das ist mir Wurst

Translation: That’s sausage to me

Meaning: That doesn’t matter

Alles hat ein Ende, nur die Wurst hat zwei

Translation: Everything has an end. Only the sausage has two

Meaning: All good things must end (but said with a lot more feeling)

Sie spielt die beleidigte Leberwurst

Translation: She’s playing the insulted sausage

Meaning: She’s all worked up (said with lots of gusto)

Sie spielt die beleidigte Leberwurst - She’s all worked up

Eine Extrawurst haben

Translation: To get an extra sausage

Meaning: To ask for special treatment 

Er muss zu allem seinen Senf dazugeben

Translation: He has to add his mustard to everything

Meaning: Give his two cents worth 

Wir haben zusammen noch keine Schweine gehütet!

Translation: We haven’t kept any pigs together

Meaning: We don’t know each other all that well

Wir haben zusammen noch keine Schweine gehütet - We don’t know each other all that well

Schwein haben

Translation: To have a pig

Meaning: To be lucky. Obviously to Germans having a pig means a lot more that having a cow means to the English speaking world.

Mein Englisch ist unter aller Sau

Translation: My English is under all pig

Meaning: My English is really bad

Wie die Kuh vorm neuen Tor dastehen

Translation: Like a cow standing in front of a new door

Meaning: Confused, much like someone faced with a new situation

Der Elefant und das Lamm - Amazon
Der Elefant und das Lamm – Amazon

Da liegt der Hase im Pfeffer!

Translation: There’s a rabbit in the pepper

Meaning: something that is depressing, a catastrophe.

Da steppt der Bär

Translation: That’s where the bear dances

Meaning: A great party

Jemandem einen Bären aufbinden

Translation: To tie a bear to someone

Meaning: to deceive someone into accepting something false

Der Löwe und der Hund  - Amazon
Der Löwe und der Hund – Amazon

Affentheater

Translation: Monkey theatre

Meaning: An outrageous behavior (Its origin lies back in the 19th century and the ambulant animal fun shows)

Sie hat ein Kater

Translation:She has a tomcat

Meaning: She’s got a hangover

Das ist ein Katzensprung

Translation: That’s a cat jump

Meaning: Something is very close, a stone’s throw away

Der Gepard und der Hund - Amazon
Der Gepard und der Hund – Amazon

Das Leben ist kein Ponyhof

Translation: Life is no pony farm

Meaning: Life is not easy

Vogel friss oder stirb

Translation: Bird eat or die

Meaning: Pretty straight forward. It’s a do or die situation. 

Der Fisch stinkt vom Kopf her

Translation: The fish starts stinking from the head

Meaning: Problems always start at the top (so very true in politics)

Sie hat einen Vogel

Translation: She has a bird

Meaning: She is mentally ill

Wo sich Fuchs und Hase gute Nacht sagen

Translation: Where fox and hare say goodnight to one another

Meaning: in the middle of nowhere, in a remote location (and surely not in a story book)

Da liegt der Hund begraben

Translation: That’s where the dog’s buried

Meaning: That’s the heart of the matter – when you want to show that you know what the situation is about

Katze in Sack kaufen

Translation: To buy a cat in a sack

Meaning: To buy something without inspecting it first

Wer weiß, warum die Gänse barfuß gehen

Translation: Who knows why the geese go barefoot

Meaning: That’s just the way it is

Schlafen wie ein Murmeltier

Translation: Sleep like a marmot

Meaning: Sleep like a log

Tomaten auf den Augen haben

Translation: To have tomatoes in your eyes

Meaning: Not being able to see the obvious

Klar wie Kloßbrühe

Translation: clear as dumpling broth

Meaning: crystal clear

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32 original Afrikaans idioms sure to make you smile once translated into English via @PatFurstenberg, #SouthAfrica #languages #learning #fun #amreading

Afrikaans, a language rich in idioms and emotions, is the world’s youngest national language and one of South Africa’s 11 official languages. Born about 350 years ago through a blend of Dutch, German and French spoken by settlers in what is now South Africa, Afrikaans is part of the West Germanic languages and is currently spoken by approximately 13 million people found mostly in South Africa, Namibia, Botswana and Zimbabwe.

Idioms are reputable for having a meaning not deductible from that of the individual words. Let’s see how some Afrikaans idioms translate into English.

1. Alle grappies op ‘n stokkie

English: All jokes on a stick

Meaning: On a more serious note

2. As die hemel val is ons almal dood

English: If heaven falls, we’re all dead

Meaning: To complain less; let’s not always think about what could go wrong

3. Die aap uit die mou laat

English: To let the monkey out of the sleeve

Meaning: To release the cat out of the bag; to spill the beans

Die aap uit die mou laat - To spill the beans
Die aap uit die mou laat – To spill the beans

4. Die berge het ‘n muis gebaar

English: The mountain gave birth to a mouse

Meaning: When you put in a lot of effort into a project but have very little to show for it

5. Die bobbejaan agter die bult gaan uithaal

English: To fetch a baboon from behind the hill

Meaning: To think or talk about problems that haven’t happened yet, thus possibly making them happen.

6. Dis die klein jakkalsies wat die wingerde verniel

English: It is the small jackals that ruined the vineyard

Meaning: Small mistakes can cause big troubles

Nou in Afrikaans - kinderboeke 4+ - Get them on Amazon
Nou in Afrikaans – kinderboeke 4+ – Get them on Amazon

7. Die doodskleed het geen sakke nie

English: A dead man’s suit does not have pockets

Meaning: When you die, your possessions mean nothing

8. Die geel baadjie aan hê

English: To wear a yellow jacket

Meaning: To be jealous

9. Die poppe gaan dans

English: The dolls will dance

Meaning: There’s going to be trouble

Die poppe gaan dans - There's going to be trouble
Die poppe gaan dans – There’s going to be trouble

10. Dis ‘n feit soos ‘n koei

English:  It’s a fact like a cow

Meaning: It is a fact you can’t argue with

11. Dit weet die aap se stert

English: What the monkey’s tail knows

Meaning: Something everyone knows

12. Hang aan ‘n tak

English: Hanging onto a branch

Meaning: Hold on for a second

Die Leeu en die Hond - Get it on Amazon
Die Leeu en die Hond – Get it on Amazon

13. Hoe kaler die jakkals, hoe groter die stert

English: The more naked the jackal, the bigger its tail is

Meaning: Those who have the least to show for themselves, brag the most

14. Hy het ‘n klap van die windmeul weg

English: He’s been hit by a windmill

Meaning: To not be sound of mind

15. Hy skil sy aartappels nie twee keer nie

English: You don’t peel your potatoes twice

Meaning: Get it right the first time.

Hy skil sy aartappels nie twee keer nie - Get it right the first time
Hy skil sy aartappels nie twee keer nie – Get it right the first time

16. Iemand heuning om die mond smeer

English: To rub honey on someone’s mouth

Meaning: To butter someone up with flattery

17. Iemand ‘n gat in die kop praat

English: To talk a hole in someone’s head

Meaning: To find a way to persuade someone (to do something bad)

18. Jakkals trou met wolf se vrou

English: The jackal is marrying the wolf’s wife

Meaning: Used when the weather is surprising: it rains on a sunny day

Die Jagluiperd en die Hond - Get it on Amazon
Die Jagluiperd en die Hond – Get it on Amazon

19. Jy krap met ‘n kort stokkie aan ‘n groot leeu se bal

English: You scratch a big lion’s bollocks with a shot stick

Meaning: To be arrogant; to push one’s luck

20. Katjie van die baan

English: A kitten from the track

Meaning: Used to describe someone with social skills, with humor. It can also be used when children stay up too late at night.

21. ‘n Aap in die mou hê

English: To have a monkey up your sleeve

Meaning: To have something up your sleeve; to hide a mischievous plan

‘n Aap in die mou hê - to have something up your sleeve
‘n Aap in die mou hê – to have something up your sleeve

22. ‘n Hond uit ‘n bos gesels

English: To talk a dog out of a bush

Meaning: To have a great conversation or to describe someone very chatty

23. ‘n Gat in die dag slaap

English: To sleep a hole in the day

Meaning: To sleep very late

24. ʼn Man van twaalf ambagte en dertien ongelukke

English: A man of twelve trades and thirteen accidents

Meaning: Used to describe a Jack of all trades, but a master of none

Die Olifant en die Skaap - Get it on Amazon
Die Olifant en die Skaap – Get it on Amazon

25. Moenie die hoender ruk nie

English: Don’t shake the chicken

Meaning: Don’t overdo it

26. Nes ‘n aap op ‘n stokkie

English: Like a monkey on a stick

Meaning: To look perplexed

27. Nou nou

English: Now now
Meaning: In a little while, in a bit

Nou nou - In a little while, in a bit
Nou nou – In a little while, in a bit

28. So ‘n bek moet jam kry

English: such a mouth should get jam

Meaning: Used when someone says something you agree with or when someone is witty and deserves a praise.

29. So skaars soos ‘n tweedehandse doodskis

English: As scarce as a second hand coffin

Meaning: Something extremely rare

30. Sy kerk is uit

English: His church is out

Meaning:It’s all over for him; he doesn’t stand another chance.

31. Twee rye spore loop

English: To walk two lines of tracks

Meaning: To be drunk

32. Wors in die hondehok soek

English: To search for a sausage in a dog’s kennel

Meaning: To look for the needle in the haystack, to look for something you cannot find

Did you know that the biggest South African communities outside of South Africa are found in the UK, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Israel, Chile, Portugal and Greece?


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19 German Compound Words with Surprising Translations: Mammutwörter and the Longest German, English and Welsh Words via @PatFurstenberg #german #english #translation #language

For many of us, myself included, learning German is like climbing the Himalayas Mountains. If the grammar or the articles don’t get to you, the compound words without exact translation into English will – because in some German compound words the stem words don’t keep their meaning. The beauty of it is that once you do learn their meaning you grasp their beauty.

Dreikäsehoch

Literally: Three + cheese + high

Meaning: the loving nickname you would give a small child who is only as tall as three wheels of cheese stacked on top of each other.

Precious! Reminds me of Heidi!

Dreikäsehoch - three cheese high

Eselsbrücke

Literally: donkey bridge

Meaning: a mnemonic device, a memory aide

Eselsbrücke - memory aide

Flak

Flak is an acronym for a pre – World War 2 anti-aircraft gun: Fliegerabwehrkanone

Fliegerabwehr means “defense against air attack” and Kanone means cannon.

Flak - defense against air attack

Fernweh

Literally: Distance + pain

Meaning: It describes the feeling you get when you want to be somewhere else, a yearn for the freedom and adventure of travel. Similar to wanderlust (see below).

Fernweh - desire to go far away

Handschuh

Literally: hand shoe

Meaning: glove

How very logical, right?

Handschuh - glove

Handschuhschneeballwerfer

Literally: Glove + snowball + throwe

Meaning: a wimp.

If you ever tried to through more than one snowball without your gloves on you will not agree with this meaning. I second that.

Kindergarten

 Literally: Children + garden

Friedrich Froebel, a 19th Century German educator, was one of the first to believe that children needed some formal education, through play and exploration, before primary school.

Froebel opened his first kindergarten in 1837, and the curriculum included playing with toys, playing games and singing songs. By the 1880s, kindergartens opened in Austria, Belgium, Canada, Germany, Great Britain, the Netherlands, Hungary, Japan, Switzerland, and the United States.

The word itself came into English in 1852—the same year that Froebel died.

Kindergarten, coined by Froebel in 1837, adopted in English in 1852.

Kopfkino

Literally: head cinema

Meaning: your vivid imagination

Kühlschrank

Literally: cool + cupboard

Meaning: refrigerator

To the point!

Kühlschrank  - fridge

Meerschweinschen

Literally: Sea + little pig

Meaning: guinea pig

Meerschweinschen  - guinea pig

Nacktschnecke

Literally: literally: naked snail

Meaning:: slug

Ohrwurm

Literally: Ear + worm

Meaning: This describe that song stuck in your head, the one you are singing over and over again.

Ohrwurm - a  song stuck in your head

Schwarmerei

Not exactly a compound word, schwarmerei is derived from the German verb schwärmen, which means to swarm.

Schwarmerei refers to excessive and uninhibited enthusiasm and also puppy love.

Schwarmerei  - enthusiams, puppy love

Sturmfrei

Literally: Storm (tempest) + free

Meaning: When you have the house to yourself and everyone else is away

Sturmfrei - the feeling you have when you are, finally, home alone

I wonder who they refer to as the “tempest” here…

Tagedieb

Literally: day + thief

Meaning: a dilly-dallier, a lay about, a loafer

Tagedieb - laying about doing nothing

Torschlusspanik

Literally: Gate + shut + panic

Meaning: The fear we get, as we age, that time is running out and important opportunities are slipping us away.

Tick-tock, says your biological clock.

Torschlusspanik - the feeling we get that the time is running away

Treppenwitz

Literally: Stairs (staircase) + joke

Meaning: The joke you came up with but the moment to share it has already passed.

Treppenwitz  - a joke whose time has passed

Verschlimmbessern

Literally: Make something worse + to improve

Meaning: Making something worse by trying to improve it.

Sound like any home DIY to me…

Verschlimmbessern - something worse by trying to improve it

Wanderlust

Literally: Migratory / travelling + desire / appetite

Meaning: An aching desire to travel and get away.

Desire to turn into a peripatetic, a walking wanderer.

Wanderlust - desire to travel and get away

Weltschmerz

Literally: World + pain/ grief

Meaning: A feeling of melancholy or pessimism, of having lost all faith in the world and humankind.

The word Weltschmerz was born during the Romantic literary movement of the 19th century. It was first used it to describe Lord Byron’s cynical loathing for the world.

Weltschmerz - A feeling of melancholy or pessimism, of having lost all faith in the world and humankind.

Zugzwang

Literally: Pull / tug + force

Meaning: Forced to make a decision when under stress or pressure.

Zugzwang - forced to make a decision under pressure

The longest German composed word stretches at 80 letters:

Donaudampfschifffahrtselektrizitätenhauptbetriebswerkbauunterbeamtengesellschaft

The “Association for Subordinate Officials of the Head Office Management of the Danube Steamboat Electrical Services”.

The longest English word in the Oxford Dictionary has 45 letters:

Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis

“an artificial long word said to mean a lung disease caused by inhaling very fine ash and sand dust.

The longest word to be found in Britain is a Welsh place name with 58 letters:

Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch

The longest place name of the UK on a sign

You might like to read: 20 Afrikaans words with interesting English literal translations

Lesen Sie weiter:

Geliebte Kinderbücher von Patricia Furstenberg:

Der Gepard und der Hund

Der Elefant und das Lamm

Der Löwe und der Hund

JETZT AUF DEUTSCH - geliebte Kinderbücher
JETZT AUF DEUTSCH – geliebte Kinderbücher
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20 Afrikaans words with interesting English literal translations via @PatFurstenberg

When learning a new language, some of the issues we encounter are translating those crafty closed compound words – combinations of two or more words that function as a single unit and mean something different than the individual words they are built with.A

  1. Aasvoël

Direct translation: bait bird

Actual meaning: vulture

Aasvoël  - bait bird - vulture
Aasvoël – bait bird – vulture

2. Jagluiperd

Direct translation: Hunting lazy horse

Actual meaning: cheetah

Jagluiperd - lazy horse - cheetah
Jagluiperd – lazy horse – cheetah

3. Keelvol

Direct translation: full throat

Actual meaning: sick of it all

Keelvol - full throat - sick of it all
Keelvol – full throat – sick of it all

4. Knormoer

Direct translation: Growl nut

Actual meaning: starter motor

Knormoer - Growl nut - starter motor
Knormoer – Growl nut – starter motor

5. Klapkassie

Direct translation: Little Flap cupboard

Actual meaning: cubby hole

Klapkassie - Little Flap cupboard - cubby hole
Klapkassie – Little Flap cupboard – cubby hole

6. Kameelperd

Direct translation: Camel horse

Actual meaning: Giraffe

Kameelperd - Camel horse - Giraffe
Kameelperd – Camel horse – Giraffe

7. Kattekwaad

Direct translation: Cats mischief

Actual meaning: getting up to no good

Kattekwaad - Cats mischief - getting up to no good
Kattekwaad – Cats mischief – getting up to no good

8. Koggelmannetjie

Direct translation: teasing little man

Actual meaning: a male rock lizard

Koggelmannetjie - teasing little man - a male rock lizard
Koggelmannetjie – teasing little man – a male rock lizard

9. Luiperd

Direct translation: Lazy horse

Actual meaning: Leopard

Luiperd - Lazy horse - Leopard
Luiperd – Lazy horse – Leopard

10. Laatlammetjie

Direct translation: late lamb

Actual meaning: a child born many years after its siblings

Laatlammetjie - late lamb - a child born many years after its siblings
Laatlammetjie – late lamb – a child born many years after its siblings

11. Padkos

Direct translation: road food

Actual meaning: Southern African snacks and provisions for a journey

padkos - road food - Southern African snacks and provisions for a journey
padkos – road food – Southern African snacks and provisions for a journey

12. Perdeby

Direct translation: horse fly

Actual meaning: wasp

perdeby - horse fly - wasp
perdeby – horse fly – wasp

13. Pletterpet

Direct translation: falling hat

Actual meaning: helmet

Pletterpet - falling hat - helmet
Pletterpet – falling hat – helmet

14. Papier vampier

Direct translation: paper vampire

Actual meaning: stapler

Papier vampier - paper vampire - stapler
Papier vampier – paper vampire – stapler

15. Springmielies

Direct translation: Jumping corn

Actual meaning: popcorn

Springmielies - Jumping corn - popcorn
Springmielies – Jumping corn – popcorn

16. Trapsuutjie

Direct translation: step softly

Actual meaning: chameleon

Trapsuutjie - step softly - chameleon
Trapsuutjie – step softly – chameleon

17. Verkykers

Direct translation: far lookers

Actual meaning: binoculars

Verkykers - far lookers - binoculars
Verkykers – far lookers – binoculars

18. Vergrootglas

Direct translation: making big glass

Actual meaning: magnifying glass

Vergrootglas - making big glass - magnifying glass
Vergrootglas – making big glass – magnifying glass

19. Windmeulvliegtuig

Direct translation: wind mill flying plane

Actual meaning: helicopter

Windmeulvliegtuig - wind mill flying plane - helicopter
Windmeulvliegtuig – wind mill flying plane – helicopter

20. Ystervark

Direct translation: iron pig

Actual meaning: porcupine

Ystervark  - iron pig – porcupine
Ystervark – iron pig – porcupine

Nou in Afrikaans, geliefde kinderboeke:

Die Leeu en die Hond

Die Jagluiperd en die Hond

Die Olifant en die Skaap

You might also enjoy reading:

19 German Compound Words with Surprising Translations: Mammutwörter and the Longest German, English and Welsh Words

 

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