Tag Archives: lightstandard

Looking UP: Street Lamps from Bucharest, Romania #travel #pictures

This past holiday I chose to look up, towards the sun, the sky and the buildings’ roofs. I discovered some surprising sights that put a smile on my face and sparked my writer’s brain (or so I liked to imagine).

An old-style street light in Bucharest, on Lipscani Street, guarding the border between new and old - image by @PatFurstenberg
An old-style street light in Bucharest, on Lipscani Street, guarding the border between new and old – image by @PatFurstenberg

Also bordering past and present – which side would you choose?

A twin, low energy prismatic street light on Calea Victoriei, bordering old and new. Bucharest. Image by @PatFurstenberg
A twin, low energy prismatic street light on Calea Victoriei, bordering old and new. Bucharest. Image by @PatFurstenberg

I was born in Bucharest, so I am quite proud of the fact that in 1857 Bucharest was the first city in the world to introduce kerosene lamp posts on its streets. The fuel was produced in one of the world’s first refineries equipped with modern facilities, found in the nearby city of Ploiesti. Of course, only Bucharest’s city center was illuminated this way and 1,000 kerosene lamps were used, this bringing a a new craft into light in Bucharest, that of the lamplighter.

A wall-bracket Farola fernandina style street lamp on Hanul lui Manuc. The plaque reads: "1857, Bucuresti, First Capital City in the world illuminated with kerosene lamps. image by @PatFurstenberg
A wall-bracket Farola fernandina style street lamp on Hanul lui Manuc. The plaque reads: “1857, Bucuresti, First Capital City in the world illuminated with kerosene lamps. image by @PatFurstenberg

Here is another wall-bracket street light on the same building. I like the way it seem to serenade both windows. And have you noticed all the details on the facade?

Lamp post on Hanul lui Manuc, Buchrest. Image by @PatFurstenberg
Lamp post on Hanul lui Manuc, Buchrest. Image by @PatFurstenberg

To stay with the Farola fernandina style street lamp and in the same neighborhood of Bucharest, Lipscani, here’s another one:

Lamp post in Lipscani area, Bucharest, Romania. Image by @PatFurstenberg
Lamp post in Lipscani area, Bucharest, Romania. Image by @PatFurstenberg

And not too far away:

Street light in Lipscani area, Bucharest, Romania. Image by @PatFurstenberg
Street light in Lipscani area, Bucharest, Romania. Image by @PatFurstenberg

Here’s a close-up and I didn’t even have to climb a building to take this photo!

Close-up of street light in Lipscani area, Bucharest, Romania. Image by @PatFurstenberg
Street light in Lipscani area, Bucharest, Romania. Image by @PatFurstenberg

We are on a smaller street now, the light pole has a plain design. But what you see behind, the white building with lots of windows and a smaller one in the attic (where the coffee shop is!), that building houses the amazing bookshop Carturesti Carousel, a must-see.

We visited the Village Museum, as we do each time we go to Bucharest, and this time discovered:

Twin lamp post in Village Museum, Bucharest. Image by @PatFurstenberg
Twin lamp post in Village Museum, Bucharest. Image by @PatFurstenberg

Have you noticed the twin rosettes and the metal flower on top of the pole? And here is another lamp post from the Village Museum. The museum closes well before sundown, but I image it to be enchanting during the night.

Classical lamp post in Village Museum, Bucharest. Image by @PatFurstenberg

Cismigiu Park, in the heart of Bucharest, is another one of our favorite places. Paddle boats in summer, ice skating early mornings or at dusk during winter, magical!

A very old, overgrown lamp post in Cismigiu Park, Bucharest. Image by @PatFurstenberg
A very old, overgrown lamp post in Cismigiu Park, Bucharest. Image by @PatFurstenberg

Look up, it pays off! We are still in Cismigiu Park (Fountain Park, you could translate), an area linked back to 1799, when ruler Alexandru Ipsilanti ordered that two fountains be built here. Again, a new craft and title was born, that of “Grand Fountaineer” – in charge of maintaining the good order of these two fountains!

But the real Cismigiu Park was designed during the middle of the XIX century by the Viennese landscape architect Carl Wilhelm Meyer at the order of ruler Gheorghe Bibescu.

Initially, in 1860s, there were only 60 lamp posts in Cismigiu Park. Electric lighting was introduced in 1890s. I wonder if this was one of them:

A very, very old, overgrown lamp post in Cismigiu Park, Bucharest. Image by @PatFurstenberg
A very, very old, overgrown lamp post in Cismigiu Park, Bucharest. Image by @PatFurstenberg

Excited to say that back then, as now, there is a newspaper stand in Cismigiu Park!

Moving on, here are a few more street lights from around Bucharest:

A low energy prismatic street light combining new technology with a classic design. Bucharest, Romania. Image by @PatFurstenberg
A low energy prismatic street light combining new technology with a classic design. Bucharest, Romania. Image by @PatFurstenberg
My very own, Narnia-style street light on Calea Victoriei, Bucharest. Image by @PatFurstenberg
My very own, Narnia-style street light on Calea Victoriei, Bucharest. Image by @PatFurstenberg

I hope you enjoyed looking up with me. Do return for more lamp posts, next we will visit Brasov and Constanta. Why don’t you subscribe to my newsletter or follow my blog?

Any thoughts? Comment below, I’d love to hear your ideas.

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