1 March, Martisor – Tradition and Symbolism in Romania

Martie - Martisor - red and white string tied to snowdrops

They blamed it on the March wind, curious and playful, throwing off the girls’ scarfs so tightly wrapped all winter long, deceitful in its scented games, innocent in appearance, a trickster of a djinn. The red mark left on the maidens’ cheeks by the spring wind was a sure tell-tale. Some older women got it too. And there was not cure, known or unknown.

What was there to do? No one liked a blotchy face when the birds sang again of life and love and the flowers bloomed and your heart went mad with joy once more.
Someone must have gotten the idea from an old tale or a word lost in a whisper, over the fire.

Some legends say that the red-white thread was first spun by Old Dokia, Baba Dochia, as she took her sheep grazing up the mountain.

1 March Martie Martisor Romania
Nicolae Grigorescu, Peasant Woman

But who really cares where a cure originated when it works? It started in the valley, I believe, and it spread like gossip to the forest and up the mountains and even to the land over the forest and even further away…

And girls and older women together began to tie a red silky string around their neck. Thin enough to go unnoticed, yet strong to do the trick. To protect their smooth, white skin freshly sprung from a long winter against the March breeze, called the martisor.
And it worked.

And soon boys used it too. Girls and boys were gifted with this special thread on the 1st of March, before the sun showed its face up on the sky.
Soon they started to wear where it showed . For it had a red thread too, to protect their milky skin and sparkly eyes against the evil-eye.

1 March Martie Martisor Romania
1 March Martie Martisor Romania

The two threads twisted together, red and white or red and black, symbolized the unity of opposing forces: summer-winter, heat-cold, fertility-barrenness, light-dark.

Or so the story of the 1st of March, Martisor, says.

They were wearing it, maiden and wives, lasses and ladies, boys too, pinned to their chest, above the heart or around their wrists. A thread of white and red twisted together and tied in a bow. They would wear it from the 1st of March till the day they knew that Spring had won its battle against Winter: when the cuckoo sang again and the cherries bloomed, when the storks returned to their old nests and the swallows showed their fine tails in spirited flight again. When the snowdrops peaked from underneath the snow.

Then… they would tie the Martisor thread to a white rose or a blossomed tree, bearer of fruit, for good luck. The brave one would even throw it towards the directions where the migrating birds arrived from, whispering: “take my dark days and bring me bright ones.”

Later, some attached a silver coin to the silky white-red thread as a gift. Those who could afford such. The coin symbolized the sun and the Martisor became a symbol of light and of fire.
With the silver coin they would buy red wine, bread and fresh, soft, white cheese so that the girls who wore the silky thread would keep their ivory skin and have beautiful cheeks as red as wine.

1 March Martie Martisor Romania
1 March Martie Martisor and a silver coin – Romania

Why the 1st of March? 1 Martie?

You see, the Geto-Dacian tribes who inhabited during the 4th century BC the territory we now today as Romania, celebrated the New Year on the 1st of March. Their calendar had only two seasons, winter and summer. The Martisor was therefore offered for good luck on the first day of the New Year, together with heartfelt wishes for health, happiness and love.

As are my wishes to you…
La Multi Ani de Martisor!

PS. Here is my childhood collection of “Martisoare”. In Romania, we would offer them to friends on the 1st of March. Not all were made of glass. They can be fashioned out of anything.

Glass collection of Martisoare: dogs, squirrels, chimney sweep, penguins, parrots, swallow, cat, rooster, bird, swan, geese
My priceless glass collection of Martisoare
tales by Patricia Furstenberg on Amazon
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Snowy Night, a Winter’s Dream

I love the snow for what it is –
Of dreams and stars that spark,
Of clouds and tears.
Some say it’s angels in the dark.

I love the snow for what it stands,
My childhood memories asleep
And holidays with frozen hands.
Snowmen were built of snow knee-deep.

I love the snow for what it might,
The hopes it brings, the smiles it carves
Each winter, a brand new sight
To welcome with open arms.

I love the snow, I hope you too –
This thread that links all that is true.

Snowy Night Winter Dream
Christmas decorations in Cismigiu Park, Bucharest
snow at night
blizzard in the middle of the night
white flakes against a Christian Orthodox church
Snowy Night Winter Dream
winter wonderland
Snowy Night Winter Dream

I hope you enjoyed my sonnet on snowy night, a winter’s dream.
You might also enjoy reading about:
Snow’s Thousand Faces and Meanings
A Train Journey through Snow, in Romania
A Journey through the Medieval City of Sighisoara
or
Amazing Roles dogs Played During WW1: Sled Dogs, Pulling Dogs

What is it that you enjoy about snow?

snowy night winter’s dream

You can find all my books on Amazon, here.

11th Day of Christmas Haiku, #Haiku, #pipers #piping via @PatFurstenberg

11th Day of Christmas Haiku: Eleven Pipers Piping

Graceful tartan plaids

With auld bag pipes and wee drums.

Soar, golden eagle.

~

Happy New Year 2019!

In previous versions of “12 Days of Christmas” the pipers piping were ladies dancing, ladies spinning, badgers baiting, lords a-leading, lads a-louping or bulls a-beating.

The pipers piping might be a remembrance of the shepherds siting by the fire the night Jesus was born and, most probably, playing their pipes. Later bagpipes were used by musicians and became a symbol associated with Scottish fighters and soldiers.

The french bagpipe was called musette and was played by the upper class during 17th-18th centuries only to be picked up by rural people later on.

I hope you will enjoy the 12 Days of Christmas haiku; there will be published one each day starting on Christmas Day. Subscribe to my newsletter to never miss a blog post.

You can enjoy more haiku on this page of my website.

Find all my book on Amazon. Enjoy!

12 Days of Christmas images available freely on 3dinosaurs.com

Text and Haiku-San © Patricia Furstenberg.

I hope you enjoyed my haiku. Let me know your thoughts in comment below.

10th Day of Christmas Haiku, #Haiku, #lordsaleaping via @PatFurstenberg

10th Day of Christmas Haiku: Ten Lords a Leaping

On pouring days when

Sky and earth by rain are joined-

Leap frog games indoors.

~

Happy New Year 2019!

Eight days after Christmas and throughout January the Christian world celebrates the naming of baby Jesus.

In older versions of “12 Days of Christmas” the lords a leaping were pipers pipping, ships a sailing, fifers fifing, ladies dancing, men a-mowing, cocks a crowing and even asses racing.

Back in the day leaping was an exclusive men’s activity. One explanation would be that during rainy winter’s day men would keep up their stamina by playing a leap game on those long corridors of Victorian houses. Another explanation would be that leaping was used before a battle to raise the morale.

Men a leaping could also symbolize the Morris dancers that performed between courses during a Christmas feast.

I hope you will enjoy the 12 Days of Christmas haiku; there will be published one each day starting on Christmas Day. Subscribe to my newsletter to never miss a blog post.

You can enjoy more haiku on this page of my website.

Find all my book on Amazon. Enjoy!

12 Days of Christmas images available freely on 3dinosaurs.com

Text and Haiku-San © Patricia Furstenberg.

I hope you enjoyed my haiku. Let me know your thoughts in comment below.

8th Day of Christmas Haiku, #Haiku, #maidsamilking via @PatFurstenberg

8th Day of Christmas Haiku: Eight Maids a-Milking

Hay on the shed’s floor,

Steamy, barny-odour milk.

Last star shies away.

~

Happy New Year 2019!

La Multi Ani!

Gelukkige nuwe jaar!

Bliadhna mhath ur!

Blwyddyn Newydd Dda!

Bonne année!

Bliain nua fe mhaise dhuit!

Today Christianity celebrates the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of Jesus.

In older versions of “12 Days of Christmas” the maids a-milking were hares a-running and even hounds a-running or boys a-singing.

The eight maids a-milking might simply represent the goodness of the dairy products, so sought after during the Middle Ages when refrigeration was not an option.

I hope you will enjoy the 12 Days of Christmas haiku; there will be published one each day starting on Christmas Day. Subscribe to my newsletter to never miss a blog post.

You can enjoy more haiku on this page of my website.

Find all my book on Amazon. Enjoy!

12 Days of Christmas images available freely on 3dinosaurs.com

Text and Haiku-San © Patricia Furstenberg.

I hope you enjoyed my haiku. Let me know your thoughts in comment below.

 

7th Day of Christmas Haiku, #Christmas, #Haiku, #swansaswimming via @PatFurstenberg

7th Day of Christmas Haiku: Seven Swans a Swimming

Plumed water lily

Gliding shyly away. Swan.

Odette, not Odile.

~

Happy New Year 2019!

Hogmanay is celebrated today in Scotland, with the first stroke of midnight, so Slàinte Mhath!

Catholic Church celebrate Pope Sylvester today – in many Central and Eastern European countries New Year’s Eve is called Silvester.

Swans have been associated with the supernatural world by Egyptians: swan statues have been discovered in royal burial chambers. Egyptians successfully captured many of these birds during their migration and acclimatized them to the weather conditions along the Nile.They must have looked so elegant and graceful gliding with their white bodies over water and singing – more beautiful as they grow older.

Greeks, too, have a mythological story or two involving swans, perhaps the best known and most controversial being that of Leda and the Swan, in which God Zeus took the form of a swan to seduce his beloved Leda, Queen of Sparta – and thus Helen of Troy was born.

King Edward of England took his knighthood vow in Westminster Abbey on 22 May 1306 together with 266 other esquires eligible for knighthood on two swans, ‘The Feast of the Swans“. Apparently the swans had golden and crowns and since then swans have been associated with monarchy.

I hope you will enjoy the 12 Days of Christmas haiku; there will be published one each day starting on Christmas Day. Subscribe to my newsletter to never miss a blog post.

You can enjoy more haiku on this page of my website.

Find all my book on Amazon. Enjoy!

12 Days of Christmas images available freely on 3dinosaurs.com

Text and Haiku-San © Patricia Furstenberg.

I hope you enjoyed my haiku. Let me know your thoughts in comment below.

6th Day of Christmas Haiku, Haiku-San #Christmas, #Haiku, #geesealaying, #haikusan, #sunday via @PatFurstenberg

6th Day of Christmas Haiku, Sunday Haiku-San: Six Geese a Laying

Webbed feet, menace honk,

Orange bill, wings spread out. Run!

Still lake at sunset.

~

Merry Christmas!

I hope you will enjoy the 12 Days of Christmas haiku; there will be published one each day starting on Christmas Day. Subscribe to my newsletter to never miss a blog post.

In a previous version of this song the geese were ducks a-laying.

The geese has always been considered a symbol of the solar year (due to their annual migration) and of fertility.

You can enjoy more haiku on this page of my website.

Find all my book on Amazon. Enjoy!

I chose the name Haiku-San as it derives from Haiku, meaning unusual verse in Japanese (hai=unusual, ku=verse, strophe) and San, the honorific Japanese title when speaking about people. San is also the phonetic transcription of the first syllable of the English word Sunday, Sun-day hence Haiku-San, a Sunday feature on Alluring Creations involving Haiku I write.

12 Days of Christmas images available freely on 3dinosaurs.com

Text and Haiku-San © Patricia Furstenberg.

I hope you enjoyed my haiku. Let me know your thoughts in comment below.