Pairing Books with Chocolate

pairing books with chocolate

We’ve had a lovely summer here, with long and beautiful days and evenings ideal to read under the shade of a tree while enjoying a little treat, thus pairing books with chocolate sprang to life from the pages of many novels.

I’ve heard of pairing books with wine, so why not with chocolate? Books affect each reader in a different way; two people will describe the same chocolate in various ways. We understand and absorb a book through the perspective of our past experiences. We taste chocolate not only with our taste buds, but though all five senses: smell, sight, taste, touch, even by hearing.

‘We don’t see things as they are, we see things as we are.”

Anaïs Nin

Take a break with me. Discover new reads or new flavors of chocolate. And if you don’t have any nearby, don’t worry. At the end of this blog post there is a 1 minute, tried and tested, no-egg microwave brownie recipe 🙂 Our favorite!

In no particular order I paired:

A Convenant of Spies – Daniel Kemp

Pairing Books Chocolate

Unexpectedly unbreakable, but giving in if you know how to take it. Definitely not what it reveals to the eye. Gentle browns of a hard milk chocolate with extra cocoa, spicy with a hint of spirits that reveals itself on the back of the tongue.

Much like Daniel Kemp’s A Covenant Of Spies deals with British Intelligence investigating Russian operative. But look beyond the cover, to a complex tale featuring a net of lies and political cover-ups that will make you doubt tomorrow’s news headlines. An entertaining story of 21st century spies and tales of the Cold War sprinkled with clues till the end, it reminded me of Bridge of Spies.
Book four in the ‘Lies and Consequences’ series, espionage, mystery thriller and crime. Daniel Kemp blogs here.

Life’s Rich Tapestry: Woven in Words by Sally Cronin

Mersi is an indulgent assortment of fine milk chocolate, nutty pralines, or bitter-sweet dark bites to spoil your taste buds with a new surprise in each tablet. Just like life itself.

I chose to pair Cronin’s Life’s Rich Tapestry with a selection of Merci chocolates because her book offers an indulgent collection of short stories, micro fiction and poetry that match so many of life’s moments. Her book made me smile and dream, it brought chuckles and it even made my eyes wet. Is a book you want to read on, as the author is a gifted writer, each chapter in her book a temptation, and so are the illustrations.
An appreciated work of literary fiction. Sally blogs here.

Vanished by Mark Bierman

Pairing Books Chocolate

Dark, strong, and intense, chocolate at its finest and not for the soft-hearted, yet with a subtle aroma of raspberries and a salty aftertaste that only accentuates the quality of its cocoa. This is a no-mess, straight forward taste that lingers long after you ate it. Memorable.

Bierman’s novel Vanished reminded me of James Clavell’s King Rat. Much like Clavell, Bierman reels in the reader from the first chapter. The book blends the reality of everyday life in Haiti with the race of finding a missing child believed to be abducted by slave traders. Bierman will not allow you to shield your eyes from the reality of human trafficking. What he does wonderfully and makes this book worth a read is getting the reader to root for the two main characters, as well as for those oppressed. You will be drawn into their lives and hold thumbs, prying for a happy ending.
Modern fiction at its best, shining a spotlight on the tragedy of child trafficking. A book with a powerful and important message. Mark Bierman blogs here.

Alfonso and the Monster (A Royal Tortoise Tale) by Susan Moffat

Imagine a cup of hot chocolate topped with tiny marshmallows. Soft and creamy, a joy to look at and a bliss in every sip. Marshmallows melting on the tongue, bringing back the cherished memory of camping fires and the tingling of Christmas.

I read Susan’s previous two books featuring adorable Alfonso, a snail prince, and became attached to this sweet little guy. This time he’s in the Land of Garden (how adorable this sounds!) and he tries his best at fighting what he imagines to be a monster, and does so in a very entertaining way. My favorite part must have been Alfonso’s facial expressions, Susan is a gifted artist.

When my kids were young I always chose gentle books for bedtime and they loved stories about animals who could talk. I would have chosen this one for sure ad they would have loved it. Susan blogs here.

The Memories We Bury by H. A. Leuschel

Pairing Books Chocolate

Hand made chocolate confectionery is a lush decadence I rarely I indulge in. With an inviting, sweet, outer shell dripping with a bitter espresso syrup, it surprises by offering a third flavor once you sink your teeth in. A trio of sinful almond, sweet milk chocolate, and dark coffee syrup – which one will dominate?

I had to pair this chocolate with Leuschel’s latest release, The Memories We Bury. Alternating between the POVs of its two main characters, The Memories We Bury weaves an intricate story of trust and betrayal, of a past we cannot run away from, a story that balances on the thin line bordering the healthy from the ill mind. While a third character watches from the shadows. Which is friend and which is foe?
Highly recommend if you love books that delve into human psychology. Discover Helene here.

Academic Curveball: A Kellan Ayrwick Cozy Mystery (Braxton Campus Mysteries Book 1) by James J. Cudney

When I need comfort food or a pick-me-up desert, there is nothing like an old-fashioned chocolate fudge with its magical blend of aromas and textures. Slightly crunchy and chewy, salty, dark cocoa that turns into spice as it melts into a creamy dream. Pure indulgence.

So are classical cozy mysteries, like Cudney’s Academic Curveball, Braxton Campus Mysteries #1. This book is more than a mystery, it has a complex plot that reminded me of Christie’s writing (one of my all-time favorite authors), and plenty of intrigue too. You will discover a main character (a writer!) well penned, and on a mission amid old friends and new encounters, all in the world of academia. It is a book you will not want to put down till it’s end, a veritable a-ha moment.
Well worth it, from an author you will want to remember. Listed as teen and young adult detectives and humorous fiction. James Cudney blogs here.

Dead Dry Heart by Toni Pike

I always wanted to compare chocolates that are not displayed in an assortment box. Mahogany, autumn brown, creamy white, all shades feasting the eye. To have the luxury of listening to the sound each slab makes as I snap a piece. Piling the broken chocolate shards with their various bits of nuts exposed. The anticipation of the first crispy bite, melting in various aromas, an explosion of cool, acidic cocoa, milky vanilla, and earthly nuts.

Crime noir and psychological thrillers are very much like this. Similar, yet different reads.
Pike’s Dead Dry Heart is a crispy autumn brown fueled by the heat of an unforgiving Australian sun. When the past you want to forget comes back to haunt you at a time when, finally, all works out in your life, what is there to do? Stay on the side of the law or do anything to save your present life, the one you worked so hard towards? And, if someone helped you once, how much do you owe them? Decisions I surely don’t want to ever be faced with.
A book with unexpected turns that will keep you reading past your bedtime, a main character you will develop mixed feelings towards, and even a few four-legged furry friends 🙂 Toni Pike blogs here.

Just Her Poetry Seasons of a Soul by D. L. Finn

The creamy, delicate flavor, never the same, of a box of chocolate assortments is poetry on the tongue. Quality milk chocolate crisp on the bite, only to release rivulets of various experiences, sweet, then salty, fruity, then buttery, spicy or creamy.

They compliment perfectly the harmony of Finn’s poetry selection. I don’t know about you, but I always find a moment for poetry in a day. Just Her Poetry Seasons of a Soul meets you with poems abut the beauty of nature, but also about emotions and life’s encounters. Either section you choose, Finn’s poetry will sooth raw emotions, but raise questions as well, for isn’t this one of the reasons we return to poems? By reading of another human being’s experiences we can overcome our own sad moments. By allowing a poet to uplift us, we relive a joyful experience, perhaps long forgotten.
This is the magic of poetry and Finn is a master painter with her well chosen words. Highly recommended for your bedside table. Denise Finn blogs here.

The Orphans’ Plight: An African Adventure (Fauna Park Tales) by Maretha Botha

What can be sweeter than donuts glazed with chocolate? Crunchy when you bite, your teeth sinking in fluffy, heavenly soft doughnut. Pinks, stripes, stars, playful rings, bouncy shapes like a birthday jumping castle. No one can resist a doughnut!

Maretha Botha’s The Orphans’ Plight: An African Adventure is a wonderful addition to her Fauna Park Tales. Told through the eyes oh Hope the owl, it shows how dangerous life can be even in rural Africa. I liked the fact that animals could speak and we, as readers, could understand them. The illustrations are works of art on their own, created with such insight by the author herself. They compliment the story and are abundant in details. And, YAY, there is a dog too, Flame, and he has unusual sniffing abilities 🙂
Great read for smaller grades, lots to look at and plenty to learn, do allow your child to give it a try. Maretha blogs here.

1 minute Microwave, Egg-less Brownie – Tried and tested (and finished in under 1 minute)

Yes, I hear you, next time I’ll pair books with coffee 🙂

You can discover my own books through Amazon worldwide.

The Rose at the End of my Garden, a poem

The Rose at the End of the Garden

The Rose at the End of my Garden, a poem

If you walk through the garden and follow the path,
Past the spot where the dogs love to nap,
Past the corner and up a step,
Past the grass that’s half sun, half shade…

If you step where the grass grows, escaping the cut
And watch your step for the ‘bombs’ planted by dogs,
And through the pool’s gate you go –
If the vineyard guarding the padlock will allow…

If you stop and listen, hear the grass call,
And past the wild garlic you stroll,
You could stop by the old branch or you could go on,
It is up to you. But you’re near the end, so push on…

Past the place where the fairies come out at night,
See, they left an umbrella behind,
Got caught in the Pinkhead Knotweed,
The sweet scented snowballs that blush with ease…

Hold your breath for a second, then take a bow,
Introduce yourself to the Rose, the aim of your stroll
And eight years King at the End of my Garden –
Past the brick path
And the grass half shade and half sun,
Over the dog bombs,
Through the gate,
Past the wild garlic,
Along the old log,
And the fairies’ umbrella,
At the end of each day’s stroll.

Rose End Garden poem
The Rose at the End of my Garden, a poem

© Patricia Furstenberg

Find all my novels and volumes of poetry on Amazon worldwide, in kindle and paperback.

WHY IS A CAT NOT LIKE A DOG?

Cats and Dogs

Why Is a Cat Not Like a Dog? ~ a poem from a dog’s perspective from the poetry book for animal and nature lovers ‘As Good as Gold‘.

“A cat has a heart-shaped nose above a mouth with piercing teeth,
A cat has paws with soft, pink cushions hiding sharp claws beneath,
A cat has pointy whiskers, to catch running drops of milk
And a tail to play with, a tail that flicks, made of silk.

Why is a cat
Like that?

A cat is playful, yet she loves to sleep.
A cat drinks milk, but prefers raw meat.
A cat will meow and shriek and spit when she’s upset with you,
Yet curl and purr so softly, it will lure you into a snooze.

Why does a cat
Act like that?

A cat will jump around like she has springs instead of feet,
A cat will roam at night, her eyes turn “torches” in a beat.
A cat will choose her home and master, it hardly chooses her
And if she feels like doing so, you name it, and she’ll do it with a purr.

Why does a cat
Act like that?

A cat will watch from high above, and jump upon her prey,
She’ll hardly learn a trick or two, yet pantry’s door is play.
She’ll never fetch or chew a shoe,
She’d rather use her claws
To let you know she’s made her mind,
A cat will hardly joke.

I guess a cat is just a cat as I’m a dog myself.
A cat can’t bark, she’ll spit;
She can’t protect a home, like me, she’ll use her claws instead.
A cat will lure you off to sleep by purring low and soft,
Her body’s reassuring, warm, as I dose off at noon.
I guess a cat’s a cat and could be good around the room.

I guess a cat is just like that,
She’s different and that
Is okay
With me.”

(Patricia Furstenberg, 2018)

As Good as Gold, poem about dogs and puppies
As Good as Gold is available through Amazon (Free on Kindle Unlimited)

Have you seen my Haiku page yet?

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A Boy and his Dog

a boy and his dog poem

The boy broke his run at the entrance to the park and, panting heavily he leaned forward, hands on nobly knees. A trickle of sweat ran down his ripe cheeks; another drop just missed its show, landing in the dirt. The boy watched as his breath stirred the sand at his feet; for an instant, it rolled into tiny balls.

A dog radiating as much heat as the boy, tongue hanging loose, was already there, panting underneath the thick shade on the first tree. The boy’s cheeks were a match for the dog’s exhaustion, hot and red. If one’s shirt was darkened along the middle, at the back, and had dark patches underarms, the other one’s body felt like a well stocked furnace.

“You win again, boy!” the child half croaked, half laughed, stretching to caress his best friend’s head. The fur behind the ears was still soft, like a pups’.

At the water fountain nearby the boy pressed the chrome lever then stepped sideways, allowing his dog to drink first. A red tongue lapped greedily until the dog’s entire head looked like a Christmas tree, a perfect tiny water bauble balancing at the end of each hair. The boy laughed, his lips almost pasted together by the thickness of his saliva. So thirsty! Only when the dog stopped did the boy bent over the cooling spring, yet his eyes remained on the giant fur-ball.

Sparkling and sweet, the water felt like a balm sliding down his burning throat. New life pumped through his body and the boy half closed his eyes, sighing with satisfaction.

Out of the corner of his eye he saw his dog using a front paw, then the other, wiping the water droplets off his fur. In his eagerness he seemed to be dancing. The boy burst in laughter and water splashed all over face and his hair. He laughed further as he drank. And the dog sneezed then surrendered to the shade.

a happy dog - poetry by Patricia Furstenberg

A playful breeze was fanning the leaves overhead. Their rustle had accompanied the two since they woke up that morning. Life was a holiday song. The summer seemed to be stretching endlessly, filled with possibilities. They could do anything they wanted, go any place they wished, and at any time – as long as Mother knew and they returned by supper. After all, it was the first day of summer holiday.

In the shade of the big tree there was a boy, a ball, and, of course, a dog.  Quite enough to fill an entire summer with excitement.

The dog’s tail wagged and the boy laughed. Or the boy laughed first, the two were interconnected.

The dog’s eyes followed the boy’s, reading his mind. This was a two way street.

The dog shot up as the boy stepped sideways; the dog’s tail wagged like a helicopter’s blade. The dog’s eyes were focused low, intent on the boy’s foot. The boy’s leg went swinging backwards, then forward, towards the ball. The ball flew off this earth and, at exactly the same time, the dog left the earth too, his body a spring stretching towards the sky. 

Ball and dog chased the sun’s rays further and further away. Only one could win this race and both boy and dog knew which one will that be. The boy squinted as a ray of sun forced its way between the thick foliage above.

The tires screeched like a teacher’s chalk on the blackboard, leaving a question in the air – one you did not study for. The noise was out of place in this holiday with a ball, a boy, and a dog. The boy opened his mouth to call, yet he could not remember what words to use so he chocked on air. His legs were moving like they had a mind on their own, sprinting towards the road. All the boy wished for was to have wings to reach it faster.

There was no movement, just a light shadow against the black tar. And the contrast didn’t made sense, light on dark.

The scorching tar smelled of petroleum with a hinge of burned tires.

The dog, his dog, his best friend, lay under the scorching heat. There is shade under the tree, went through the boy’s mind as he circled the area.

First thing he notices were his friend’s eyes, closed. But the chest was moving! Lifting and dropping in sudden jerks. Yet the tail didn’t move when the boy collapsed nearby, senseless to the rough road scraping his bare knees.

No bleeding because his heart is so strong, thought the boy, his hands hovering over the fur, not daring to touch.

It was the first time ever, in eight months since the two were together, that the dog’s tail didn’t wag at the sound of his master’s footsteps. Only a triangle-shaped nose stretched towards the boy’s hand. It was dry and hot against the boy’s wet fingers. The dog licked them, his tongue raspy.

A trickle of sound reached as far as the boy’s ears.

a dog's paw-print on our hearts

The vet was whispering and his mother was sighing, her eyes red, yet the boy felt no fear of the big words being used: paralytic, quality of life, euthanasia. He knew what he had to do next. He had damaged his dog and somehow he was going to fix him.

All that mattered right now was that his dog was alive. The rest, he’ll figure out, make a plan, like his dad always did. The man with a plan. as his friends called him and always relied on him.

Yes, he’ll make a plan. His dog relied on him.

It’s been an accident, his mother had said. Yet she wouldn’t stop crying, trying to explain to him why his dog, his best friend, had to be put to sleep. Whatever being put to sleep meant.

And why was it that grownups only could decide on behalf of a dog?

Just because his dog couldn’t use his hind legs anymore? Put to sleep? You don’t do that to humans, do you?! You buy them wheels. The mailman had one set with a seat on them and, boy was he fast, delivering newspapers quicker than before his crash. Also a car, an “accident”.

And his grandma had a set of wheels too, with a seat and a frame, for when she went shopping.

People always got things when they got injured.

So he carried his dog home that night, the boy did. He laid him gently on his bed, arranged pillows around so that he won’t roll over and fall, not that his dog could move at all, then he fell asleep in the armchair, next to the bed.

And the next day, while his parents were at work, he carried his dog into the garage, carefully laying him down on a blanket taken from his bed.

He’d broken his dog and now he was going to fix him.

He always thought of his dad’s garage as of Aladdin’s treasure cave. You were sure to find just what you were looking for – if you only dug deep enough.

So he dug and he thought, all the time talking to his dog, like he always used to. Asking him questions, waiting for a bark in reply, acknowledging his dog’s point of view.

At one stage he stopped and listened. He thought he’d heard his dog’s tail thumping, like it always did when… before… So he popped his head from behind a pile of boxes, the shape of a smile on his face.

Nothing. The tail was as still as it’s been since the dire incident.

Yet the dog’s head cocked to one side, question in his eyes. The boy blinked away a tear.

a dog's eyes speak volumes. books by Patricia Furstenberg

“So much dust here, boy, it gets in your eyes, you know.”

He knew his first bicycle was still there, somewhere. Found it underneath a pile of old bags. He carried it slowly to where his dog was laying, for a good sniff all over, especially the training wheels.

“We want these, boy! Good boy!” he exclaimed. The tail didn’t wag, but he knew his dog was excited; he could see it in the bright eyes and the tip of those fury ears pointed at the bicycle.

The training wheels, a couple of old copper pipes, some scraps of cloth to cover them with and a wide piece of leather for a comfy seat lay beside the dog. The boy’s heart thumped, pumped up with hope. He’d planned this all last night.

He’ll build his dog a set of wheels. For his hind body and legs, to support them when they will go for walks and, maybe, even runs again.

The summer was not even half way through, it’s end still far out of sight. The days were long and full of exciting, endless possibilities for a dog on wheels and his boy.

boy dog

~ Somehow, all my books include a dog – or are about dogs! ~
Find them all on Amazon UK, Amazon US, or use this universal Amazon link.

You might also enjoy reading:

Read the opening pages of Silent Heroes

Dogs, Man’s Best Friend, as Illustrated by Art, From Once Upon a Time to the 20th Century

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Winternag – Winter Night by Eugene Marais

winter night winternag poem

Enjoy Winternag, Winter Night by Eugene Marais here in both Afrikaans and English.
Eugene Marais was a South African lawyer, naturalist, poet and writer. He wrote this poem in 1905.

Winternag, Eugene Marais

‘O koud is die windjie
en skraal.
En blink in die dof-lig
en kaal,
so wyd as die Heer se genade,
lê die velde in sterlig en skade
En hoog in die rande,
versprei in die brande,
is die grassaad aan roere
soos winkende hande.

O treurig die wysie
op die ooswind se maat,
soos die lied van ‘n meisie
in haar liefde verlaat.
In elk’ grashalm se vou
blink ‘n druppel van dou,
en vinnig verbleek dit
tot ryp in die kou!’

Winter Night, Eugene Marais

‘Cold is the slight wind and sere.
And gleaming in dim light and bare,
as vast as the mercy of God,
lie the plains in starlight and shade.
And high on the ridges,
among the burnt patches,
the seed grass is stirring
like beckoning fingers.

O tune grief-laden
on the east wind’s pulse
like the song of a maiden
whose lover proves false.
In each grass blade’s fold
a dew drop gleams bold,
but quickly it bleaches
to frost in the cold!’

English translation by Guy Butler)

Originally published in Afrikaans Poems with English Translations edited by A. P. Grove and C. J. Harvey, Cape Town, Oxford University Press, 1962

winternag winter night afrikaans english
Winternag, Winter Night by Eugene Marais – a poem in Afrikaans and English

Eugène Marais (1871-1936) had twelve brothers and sisters and grew up between Pretoria, Boshof and Paarl, South Africa. Whatever Eugène learnt at home he learnt from his mother, Catharina. Much of his early education was in English, as were his earliest poems. In 1890, at only 19 years of age, Eugène became editor of the weekly Land en Volk, the only Dutch-Afrikaans opposition newspaper in the Transvaal. The following year he became the paper’s co-owner and by 1892 the newspaper’s readership doubled. He was responsible for writing the entire paper and selling advertising space. He is remembered as the father of Afrikaans poetry.

You might also enjoy reading:
32 original Afrikaans idioms sure to make you smile once translated into English

A Poem You Can Read in English and Afrikaans

~~~

tales by Patricia Furstenberg on Amazon
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If you live in South Africa you can also purchase my books through Loot.

A Rose by any other Language on Shakespeare’s Birthday

red roses on Shakespeare's Birthday

A Rose by Any Other Language or finding a suitable translation to ‘A rose by any other name would smell as sweet‘ in various languages to celebrate the Birthday of William Shakespeare, believed to have born on this day, the 23rd of April, in 1564.

A rose by any other name would smell as sweet” are words spoken by Juliet in the famous balcony scene of Act II, Scene II of Romeo and Juliet. The line refers to Romeo’s house, Montague, and it implies that his name (and thus his family’s feud with Juliet’s family, the Capulets) means nothing to her and they should be together.

A name is but a label we affix to an object or a person. Its intrinsic value is not / should not be affected by it. Individuals or things are worth what they carry inside. Thus, even if we call a rose by an entirely different name, it would smell the same as it does by its name “rose.”

By extension, to show someone how important they are to us, we give them nicknames, and we often give our pets human names, to show that in our eyes they are valuable, equal members of our family.

But is Juliet right to minimize the importance of names? And isn’t this line perhaps summarizing the entire tragedy of Romeo and Juliet, the play? Words have power and undermining their power can be a dangerous act. (More on this idea in a future blog post.)

One of the most quoted line from Shakespeare it appears that in the format we know it today, A rose by any other name would smell as sweet, was edited into the text of the play during the 18th century by Irish editor by Edmond Malone.

But does it really matter?

 A rose by any other name would smell as sweet. William Shakespeare quote - a pink rose opening, three pink buds behind, the idea of sweetness implied, Rose Language Shakespeare Birthday
A rose by any other name would smell as sweet. William Shakespeare

A Rose by Any Other Language on Shakespeare’s Birthday

A rose by any other name would smell as sweet.’

Un trandafir cu orice alt nume ar mirosi la fel de dulce.’ (Romanian)

‘Ce que nous appelons une rose, sous tout autre nom sentirait aussi bon.’ (French)

Das, was wir eine Rose nennen, würde bei jedem anderen Namen genauso süß duften.‘ (German)

”n Roos by enige ander naam ruik net so soet.’ (Afrikaans)

Zou een roos minder zoet geuren als ze een andere naam zou dragen?‘ (Dutch)

a Shakespeare rose quote using emoji, Rose Language Shakespeare Birthday
A Shakespearean rose quote using emoji

Una rosa por cualquier otro nombre olería tan dulce.‘ (Spanish)

‘Aquilo que chamamos de rosa por qualquer outro nome, teria um cheiro tão doce.’ (Portuguese)

Ciò che chiamiamo rosa anche con un altro nome conserva sempre il suo profumo.‘ (Italian)

‘To, co zowiem różą, pod inną nazwą równieby pachniało.’ (Polish)

‘то, что мы называем розой любым другим именем будет пахнуть, как сладкий.’ (Russian)

Ajo që ne e quajmë trendafil me cdo emër tjetër do te kishte gjithsesi erë të ëmbël.‘ (Albanian)

‘”mis tahes teise nimega roos oleks lõhn nagu magus’ (Estonian)

det som vi kaller en rose av noen andre navn ville lukte så søt.‘ (Norwegian)

‘Αυτό που ονομάζουμε τριαντάφυλλο, με οποιοδήποτε άλλο όνομα θα μύριζε εξίσου ωραία.’ (Greek)

‘Hiyo ambayo tunaiita rose kwa jina lingine yoyote inge harufu kama tamu.’ (Swahili)

‘Güle başka isim tarafından gül dediğiniz gibi tatlı kokardı.’ (Turkish)

If you know how to say ‘A rose by any other name would smell as sweet’ in a different language to add it in comment below and let’s celebrate Shakespeare and his Birthday together 🙂

As always, you can find all my books on Amazon.

One World: Together At Home #OneWorldTogetherAtHome

one world together at home a poem

One World: Together At Home is an unique, never before seen world wide event in support of health care workers and World Health Organization (WHO).
This is my acrostic poem.

On the day when the world turned outside-in,

None went outside, we were all forced within,

Enclosed between walls we once called a home

With our loved ones close, yet all alone.

On the day when most likely to happen

Remained inside a book and the unknown

Lived among us, with no face and no form,

Desired by none, the unwanted guest

That stuck to every thought, cornering hope

On the last step of a tower of soap.

Gravel underfoot, being in a crowd

Ever happened? Was a dream saved on cloud?

That day, nameless for us, for them meant fight,

Humble in white or blue, up dawn to night

Emerging in a mask to fight the plague;

Routine, for them, is stop faceless outbreak.

Attack, advance, retreat, regroup, surprise;

Thread gently, beam, cheer up, engage, excite.

Halt the pandemic, lock it in glass vile

Once and for all. We watch from a safe mile.

Meet us for a hug outdoors thereafter

Edit life for now, put back the laughter.

One World: Together At Home, a poem © Patricia Furstenberg

Have you watched the One World: Together at Home on the 18th of April?

My favorite performance must have been the one by Jennifer Lopez performing “People” (this classical Barbra Streisand song).
One World: Together at Home, J Lo, “People”:

You can watch the entire One World: Together at Home show here on YouTube.

Artists featured in the broadcast included:

  • Alicia Keys
  • Amy Poehler
  • Andrea Bocelli
  • Awkwafina
  • Billie Eilish
  • Billie Joe Armstrong of Green Day
  • Burna Boy
  • Camila Cabello
  • Celine Dion
  • Chris Martin
  • David & Victoria Beckham
  • Eddie Vedder
  • Ellen DeGeneres
  • Elton John
  • FINNEAS
  • Idris and Sabrina Elb
  • J Balvin
  • Jennifer Lopez
  • John Legend
  • Kacey Musgraves
  • Keith Urban
  • Kerry Washington
  • Lady Gaga
  • Lang Lang
  • Lizzo
  • LL COOL J
  • Lupita Nyong’o
  • Maluma
  • Matthew McConaughey
  • Oprah Winfrey
  • Paul McCartney
  • Pharrell Williams
  • Priyanka Chopra Jonas
  • Sam Smith
  • Shah Rukh Khan
  • Shawn Mendes
  • Stevie Wonder
  • Taylor Swift
  • Usher

Artists featured on streaming platforms included:

  • Adam Lambert
  • Andra Day
  • Angèle, Anitta
  • Annie Lennox
  • Becky G
  • Ben Platt
  • Billy Ray Cyrus
  • Black Coffee
  • Bridget Moynahan
  • Burna Boy
  • Cassper Nyovest
  • Charlie Puth
  • Christine and the Queens
  • Common
  • Connie Britton
  • Danai Gurira
  • Delta Goodrem
  • Don Cheadle
  • Eason Chan
  • Ellie Goulding
  • Erin Richards
  • FINNEAS
  • Heidi Klum, Hozier
  • Hussain Al Jasmi
  • Jack Black
  • Jacky Cheung
  • Jack Johnson
  • Jameela Jamil
  • James McAvoy
  • Jason Segel
  • Jennifer Hudson
  • Jess Glynne
  • Jessie J
  • Jessie Reyez
  • John Legend
  • Juanes
  • Kesha
  • Lady Antebellum
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  • Lindsey Vonn
  • Lisa Mishra
  • Lola Lennox
  • Luis Fonsi
  • Maren Morris
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  • Megan Rapinoe
  • Michael Bublé
  • Milky Chance
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  • Niall Horan
  • Nomzamo Mbatha
  • P.K. Subban
  • Picture This
  • Rita Ora
  • Samuel L Jackson
  • Sarah Jessica Parker
  • Sebastián Yatra
  • Sheryl Crow
  • Sho Madjozi
  • SOFI TUKKER
  • SuperM
  • The Killers
  • Tim Gunn
  • Vishal Mishra
  • Zucchero