Movie Music Monday, Wartime Classic, WW2, Begin the Beguine, Happy New Year via @PatFurstenberg #HappyNewYear #ww2 #moviemusicmonday

A most beloved war-time classic song, Begin the Beguine was composed by Cole Porter in 1935, turned into a swing by Artie Shaw and band and made famous by Fred Astaire and Eleanor Powell. Their legendary tap dance in the movie Broadway Melody surely caught on.

Begin the Beguine  by Cole Porter – lyrics

“When they begin the beguine
It brings back the sound of music so tender,
It brings back a night of tropical splendor,
It brings back a memory ever green.I’m with you once more under the stars,
And down by the shore an orchestra’s playing
And even the palms seem to be swaying
When they begin the beguine.To live it again is past all endeavor,
Except when that tune clutches my heart,
And there we are, swearing to love forever,
And promising never, never to part.What moments divine, what rapture serene,
Till clouds came along to disperse the joys we had tasted,
And now when I hear people curse the chance that was wasted,
I know but too well what they mean;So don’t let them begin the beguine
Let the love that was once a fire remain an ember;
Let it sleep like the dead desire I only remember
When they begin the beguine.Oh yes, let them begin the beguine, make them play
Till the stars that were there before return above you,
Till you whisper to me once more,
“Darling, I love you!”
And we suddenly know, what heaven we’re in,
When they begin the beguine”

Songwriters: Cole PorterBegin the Beguine lyrics © Warner/Chappell Music, Inc, Memory Lane Music Group (Domestic)

Song lyrics and movie clip are property and copyright of their owners and are provided for educational purposes and personal use only.

The #MusicMonday meme was created by Drew @ The Tattooed Book Geek. You can pick a song that you really like and share it on Monday. I thoroughly enjoyed this blog feature on Mischenko’s lovely blog, ReadRantRockandroll .

What are your thoughts on wartime beloved songs? Do you have a favorite? Let me know in comments below.

Thank you for visiting my website.

Please follow and share:
0

6th Day of Christmas Haiku, Haiku-San #Christmas, #Haiku, #geesealaying, #haikusan, #sunday via @PatFurstenberg

6th Day of Christmas Haiku, Sunday Haiku-San: Six Geese a Laying

Webbed feet, menace honk,

Orange bill, wings spread out. Run!

Still lake at sunset.

~

Merry Christmas!

I hope you will enjoy the 12 Days of Christmas haiku; there will be published one each day starting on Christmas Day. Subscribe to my newsletter to never miss a blog post.

In a previous version of this song the geese were ducks a-laying.

The geese has always been considered a symbol of the solar year (due to their annual migration) and of fertility.

You can enjoy more haiku on this page of my website.

Find all my book on Amazon. Enjoy!

I chose the name Haiku-San as it derives from Haiku, meaning unusual verse in Japanese (hai=unusual, ku=verse, strophe) and San, the honorific Japanese title when speaking about people. San is also the phonetic transcription of the first syllable of the English word Sunday, Sun-day hence Haiku-San, a Sunday feature on Alluring Creations involving Haiku I write.

12 Days of Christmas images available freely on 3dinosaurs.com

Text and Haiku-San © Patricia Furstenberg.

I hope you enjoyed my haiku. Let me know your thoughts in comment below.

Please follow and share:
0

5th Day of Christmas Haiku, #Christmas, #Haiku, #goldenrings via @PatFurstenberg

5th Day of Christmas Haiku: Five Golden Rings

Circle of promise

Written in gold, forever.

Five rings mugger’s luck.

~

I hope you will enjoy the 12 Days of Christmas haiku; there will be published one each day starting on Christmas Day. Subscribe to my newsletter to never miss a blog post.

In previous versions of “12 Days of Christmas” five golden rings have been hares running or goldie rings.

These golden rings seem a bit out of place mentions in the middle of a list of birds (partridge, doves, hens, calling birds, geese, swans), isn’t it?

Golden Pheasant
Golden Pheasant

That’s because they might actually refer to the golded rings around the neck of the Golden Pheasant.

Some scholars suggest that the golden rings are actually goldspinks, a 1700’s name for another bird, the European Goldfinch.

There is a Greek legend that might played some influence here. It speaks of Jason and the Argonauts, his crew of men, who went in the quest for the Golden Fleece as ordered by kind Pelias in order to place Jason legally on the throne of Thessaly.

“To take my throne, which you shall, you must go on a quest to find the Golden Fleece.”

From their quest they also brought golden birds, Phasianos ornis in Greek, bird of the river Phasis (Φασιανὸς ὂρνις), the “ring-necked pheasant. But being just introduced in the country they were quite scares so eating them was a luxury of the very rich.

You can enjoy more haiku on this page of my website.

Find all my book on Amazon. Enjoy!

12 Days of Christmas images available freely on 3dinosaurs.com

Text and Haiku-San © Patricia Furstenberg.

I hope you enjoyed my haiku. Let me know your thoughts in comment below.

Please follow and share:
0

4th Day of Christmas Haiku, #Christmas, #Haiku, #callingbirds via @PatFurstenberg

4th Day of Christmas Haiku: Four Calling Birds

Thick necks, black, shaggy

Feathers, raven’s high shrill warns:

Fear! Four calling birds.

~

Merry Christmas!

I hope you will enjoy the 12 Days of Christmas haiku; there will be published one each day starting on Christmas Day. Subscribe to my newsletter to never miss a blog post.

Today Christianity celebrates the The Feast of the Holy Innocents, remembering the baby boys killed by King Herod while trying to find baby Jesus and get rid of Him.

In previous versions of “12 Days of Christmas” the calling birds were colly birds, collie birds, coloured birds or canary birds – but meaning black birds, the European Blackbird or the common blackbird, Turdus Merula, ‘colly’ deriving from ‘coaly’, of ‘coal’ color, black – the crow.

Let’s remember the Medieval culinary traditions involving gourmet meals on special occasions and baked pies with surprising fillings! Blackbirds, being quite big and abundant during those times,were considered a delicacy – so four black birds for a Christmas time feast was appealing. Remember, “Song of Six Pence” speaks of 24 blackbirds baked in a pie!

You can enjoy more haiku on this page of my website.

Find all my book on Amazon. Enjoy!

12 Days of Christmas images available freely on 3dinosaurs.com

Text and Haiku-San © Patricia Furstenberg.

I hope you enjoyed my haiku. Let me know your thoughts in comment below.

Please follow and share:
0

3rd Day of Christmas Haiku, #Christmas, #haiku, #frenchhens via @PatFurstenberg

3rd Day of Christmas Haiku: Three French Hens

Three salmon shade hens

Dance. Feathered feet, ten toes each.

A bright green worm stretched.

~

Merry Christmas!

I hope you will enjoy the 12 Days of Christmas haiku; you can read one each day starting on Christmas Day.Subscribe to my newsletter to never miss a blog post.

Today Christianity celebrates St John the Apostle.

In a previous version of “The 12 Days of Christmas” the three french hens were fat hens or turtle doves; also, french might mean foreign.

Subscribe to my newsletter to never miss a blog post.

You can enjoy more haiku on this page of my website.

Find all my book on Amazon. Enjoy!

12 Days of Christmas images available freely on 3dinosaurs.com

Text and Haiku-San © Patricia Furstenberg.

I hope you enjoyed my haiku. Let me know your thoughts in comment below.

Please follow and share:
0

2nd Day of Christmas Haiku, #Christmas, #haiku, #doves via @PatFurstenberg

2nd Day of Christmas Haiku: Two Turtle Doves

Fluffed up and coo-ing,

Two turtle doves dance tango.

Bright blue sky above.

~

Merry Christmas!

Happy Boxing Day!

Happy Saint Stephen’s  Day (the first Christian martyr!).

Did you know that today is the exact day when the Christmas Carol Good Kind Wenceslas tales place?

In an older version of this song the turtle doves were french hens.

I hope you will enjoy the 12 Days of Christmas haiku; there will be published one each day starting on Christmas Day. Subscribe to my newsletter to never miss a blog post.

You can enjoy more haiku on this page of my website.

Find all my book on Amazon. Enjoy!

12 Days of Christmas images available freely on 3dinosaurs.com

Text and Haiku-San © Patricia Furstenberg.

I hope you enjoyed my haiku. Let me know your thoughts in comment below.

Please follow and share:
0

1st Day of Christmas Haiku, #Christmas, #partridge, #peartree via @PatFurstenberg

1st Day of Christmas Sunday Haiku: Haiku-San, A Partridge in a Pear Tree

Partridge in pear tree

Feathers fly around, chirping.

I contemplate snow.

~

Merry Christmas!

I hope you will enjoy the “12 Days of Christmas” themed haiku published here starting today, on the Day Christianity celebrates the Birth of Jesus. This song is over 230 years old and was first publish without musical accompaniment, as a chant.

What is the pear tree doing in a Christmas song? Cecil Sharp, an English folk song connoisseur, believes that pear tree is just the French perdrix (partridge) lost in translation: “un’ perdrix sole”

Did you know that in the old versions of “12 Days of Christmas” the word on was not present at the beginning of each verse? It was introduced in the 1909 printed version of Austin and it stuck – proof to the power of the printed word.

Did you know that some older versions have juniper tree or June apple tree instead of pear tree?

In older versions my true love is  replaced by my mother and partridge is replaced with very pretty peacock.

“12 Days of Christmas” is a cumulative song, the verse structure modified so that each verse is based on the previous one with minor additions. Other such songs are The Barley Mow:

“Here’s good luck to the pint pot,
Good luck to the barley mow
Jolly good luck to the pint pot,
Good luck to the barley mow.

Here’s good luck to the quart pot,
Good luck to the barley mow
Jolly good luck to the quart pot,
Good luck to the barley mow”

or The Rattlin’ Bog:

“Hi ho, the rattlin’ bog,
The bog down in the valley-o,
Hi ho, the rattlin’ bog,
The bog down in the valley-o.

1. Now in the bog there was a tree,
A rare tree, a rattlin’ tree,
The tree in the bog,
And the bog down in the valley-o.

2. And on that tree there was a branch,
A rare branch, a rattlin’ branch,
The branch on the tree, and the tree in the bog,
And the bog down in the valley-o.”

Yiddish folk music contains many wonderful examples of cumulative songs. The French nursery rhyme Alouette is another great example.

Subscribe to my newsletter to never miss a blog post.

You can enjoy more haiku on this page of my website

Find all my book on Amazon. Enjoy!

12 Days of Christmas images available freely on 3dinosaurs.com

Text and Haiku-San © Patricia Furstenberg.

The song verse are quoted for educational purpose only, source wikipedia.

I hope you enjoyed my haiku. Let me know your thoughts in comment below.

 

Please follow and share:
0

Movie Music Monday, Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas, Meet Me in St. Louis , 1944, Judy Garland via @PatFurstenberg #Christmas #moviemusicmonday

Movie Music Monday, Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas, Meet Me in St. Louis , 1944, Judy Garland via @PatFurstenberg #Christmas #moviemusicmonday

One of my old times favorite Christmas movies – ever since I can remember – is Meet Me in St. Louis and I am thrilled that it remained a Christmas favorite in our family!

The musical Meet Me in St. Louis follows the events of a whole year in the lives of the colorful Smith family at the very beginning of the 20th century. You have fun and laughter, lots of singing and a worry-free lifestyle, at least for the children of the family! An MGM production, the movie was based on a series of short stories by Sally Benson, originally published in The New Yorker magazine under the title “5135 Kensington”, and later in novel form as Meet Me in St. Louis.

Moonlight glow, sparkles and a red dress on Christmas Eve…

Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas
(as sung by Judy Garland)


Have yourself a merry little Christmas
Let your heart be light
Next year all our troubles will be out of sight
Have yourself a merry little Christmas
Make the yuletide gay
Next year all our troubles will be miles away
Once again as in olden days
Happy golden days of yore
Faithful friends who are dear to us
Will be near to us once more
Someday soon we all will be together
If the fates allow
Until then we’ll have to muddle through somehow
So have yourself a merry little Christmas now


Songwriters: Hugh Martin / Ralph Blane
Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

Note: the line “Until then we’ll have to muddle through somehow” was replaced by a more celebratory “Hang a shining star upon the highest bough” when Frank Sinatra recorded this song in 1957.

“Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas” lyrics  and movie clip are property and copyright of their owners. “Meet Me in St. Louis” movie clip is provided for educational purposes and personal use only.

The #MusicMonday meme was created by Drew @ The Tattooed Book Geek. You can pick a song that you really like and share it on Monday. I thoroughly enjoyed this blog feature on Mischenko’s lovely blog, ReadRantRockandroll .

What are your thoughts on White Christmas? Have you watched it yet? If not, December is a good month to watch a romantic musical!

Let me know in comments below.

Please follow and share:
0

Christmas Eve, #Christmas #Haiku via @PatFurstenberg

Christmas Eve Haiku

A star shines brighter,

Yearly promise of hope.

Last unwrapped present.

~

Welcome to Christmas Haiku!

I hope you enjoyed the December haiku posted daily since the beginning of the month. You can find the other Christmas haiku on this page of my website.

Starting with Christmas Day I will post a new series of haiku: the 12 days of Christmas, my Christmas prezzie for YOU! Subscribe to my blog (newsletter sign up on the right column or beneath this post) and never miss a haiku with your morning coffee or favorite cuppa!

You can enjoy more haiku on this page of my website

Merry Christmas!

Find all my book on Amazon. Enjoy!

Text and Haiku-San © Patricia Furstenberg.

I hope you enjoyed my haiku. Let me know your thoughts in comment below.

 

 

Please follow and share:
0

Festive Dessert for Christmas and Easter, Romanian Cozonac, a Sweet Bread Recipe, Reteta Cozonac

Cozonac is not only a culinary tradition , but a lesson in history as well. First baked in Ancient Egypt, sweetened with honey and filled with nuts, it soon appealed the Greeks plakoús, πλακούς – who added raisins and walnuts into its filling. Next, the Romans loved it, adding their own spin to the recipe, dried fruits, and sharing it all over the Roman Empire – Romania included.

Cozonac Recipe

NOTE: this recipe makes 4 loaves (and 3 baby ones, please see below). Half it if you want to make less.

The cozonac is a sweet bread with filling, so having a filling is crucial for an all rounded taste.

TIME: preparation alone, between 3 – 4 hrs with baking time (because the cozonac must be allowed to rise twice). To reduce this time you can prepare the nut filling the day before).

This recipe makes 4 loaves and 3 baby ones

The recipe for cozonac consists of two parts:

  • the filling (this is a nut filling, but if you are allergic to nuts or prefer not to use nuts, you can skip this part and use 250 g small cut Turkish Delight or plain chocolate spread instead);
  • the sweet bread dough.

Nut filling recipe (for 2 loaves):

  • 250 ml milk (I used a lactose-free coffee creamer)
  • 425 g ground walnuts (TIP: you can put the walnuts in a sandwich bag and roll them over with a rolling pin – please see below)
  • 170 g white sugar
  • 40 ml rum extract (you can substitute with 10 ml vanilla extract)
  • 10 ml lemon extract (or lemon juice)
  • 1 Tbsp lemon zest
  • 2 Tbsp good cocoa powder (even 3 Tbsp if you love cocoa)


You can put the walnuts in a sandwich bag and roll them over with a rolling pin to ground them.
Cut the Turkish delight in quarters. You can use snow sugar (icing sugar) to stop it from sticking.

How to prepare the nut filling:

Melt sugar in milk over medium heat.

Melt sugar in milk over medium heat.

Add ground walnuts and stir for 10 minutes, until mixture is thickened.

Add ground walnuts and stir for 10 minutes, until mixture is thickened.

Remove from the heat and add cocoa, rum extract, lemon extract, and lemon zest. Set aside and let it cool.

Remove from the heat and add cocoa, rum extract, lemon extract, and lemon zest.

Sweet bread dough recipe (makes 4 loaves):

  • 1 l milk (I used a lactose-free coffee creamer)
  • 2 kg white flour
  • 12 Tbsp white sugar
  • 2 Tbsp lemon zest
  • 40 ml rum extract (or use 5ml lemon juice + 10ml Vanilla)
  • 6 -9 eggs at room temperature (depending on the size, e.g. 6 XL or 9 small). Use the freshest eggs you can find. The yolks will also give the cozonac, when cooked, a lovely light-yellow tint.
  • 300 g butter (at room temperature)
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 3 packets fast rising dry yeast (3×10 g)
  • 1 beaten egg for brushing the top of the loaves (or milk)

TIP: you will need a mixing bowl big enough to accommodate both your fists and still to give you enough space to knead the dough. A big cooking pot can also be used.

Mix butter, 1/2 of the milk and sugar in a saucepan and place it over medium heat until butter is melted and sugar is dissolved. Add the other 1/2 of the milk and let it cool until just warm.

Mix butter, 1/2 of the milk and sugar in a saucepan and place it over medium heat

Beat the eggs and blend them in the lukewarm milk mixture. Add lemon zest and rum / vanilla essence. Mixture should be +- 35 Degrees before adding it to the flour (too cool and the yeast will not be activated; too hot and it will kill the yeast).

We used 9 small size eggs.
You need 3 tablespoons of lemon zest in total.

In a large bowl place the white flour, sprinkle the salt and the dry yeast and give it a little mix. Make a hole in the center, like a well. Add the butter-milk-sugar-egg-essence mixture in this well. Mix with a wooden spoon until all ingredients are blended together – see images below.

In a large bowl place the white flour, sprinkle the salt and the dry yeast. Add the butter-milk-sugar-egg-essence mixture in.
Mix with a wooden spoon until all ingredients are blended together.

Next you need to knead the dough with your fists for about 15 minutes. Knead then fold it over, turn the bowl 180 degrees and repeat. This will get the yeast to work. If the dough sticks to your hands pour a little bit of cooking oil (a teaspoon the most) over your hands and rub them, then knead again.

Knead then fold it over, turn the bowl 180 degrees and repeat.

Just when you are done (15 minutes later) tug the dough in all around turning it into a nice, flat ball, rub a little bit more cooking oil over its top and all around the walls of the bowl. This is important as the dough will rise, you don’t want it to stick to the walls of the bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic and a clean tea towel and place in a warm spot. Allow the dough to rise until double in size. (about 20 – 30min)

Cover the bowl with plastic and a clean tea towel

Meanwhile, oil and flour your loaf pans and sprinkle your working area with flour. You can feel like a kid again and draw something…

Oil and flour your loaf pans and sprinkle your working area with flour.

Once the dough doubled in size kneed it down the dough once or twice, then divide it into the number of loaves you decided to make.

Once it doubled in size kneed down the dough once or twice

Pick one of the balls of dough and, while holding it above the working surface, stretch it a bit. Lay it flat and roll it with the rolling pin until it is about 3-4mm thick. In lengths, it has to be a little bit longer than your cooking pan. With a butter knife divide it in three.

For each loaf: roll the dough about 3-4 mm think, cut it in three strips.

TIP: consider how many loaves you will make and divide the nut filling or the Turkish delight accordingly.

Fill each of the three strips with the fillings desired. Roll each strip, pinch both ends and pinch along the rolled edge. Plait the three rolls together into a loaf. Carefully pick it up and place it in the pan.

Fill each of the three strips with the fillings desired. Roll each strip Plait the three rolls together into a loaf.

Repeat for the remainder loaves.

Repeat for the remainder loaves.

Place each cozonac into a greased and floured loaf pan, brush with egg or milk and cover with a lightly greased plastic and a clean tea towel.

Place each cozonac into a greased and floured loaf pan, brush with egg or milk and cover with a lightly greased plastic

Allow the loaves to rise for another 20-30 minutes in a warm place.

Switch on the oven at 170 degrees Celsius or 340 Fahrenheit (Gas 3-4).

Bake for about 45 minutes or until light brown.

Bake for about 45 minutes or until light brown.

Set the pans on their side for 5 minutes.

Remove from the pan using a butter knife and then allow the cozonac to cool completely before serving – if you can resist it.

Serve with milk, coffee, tea, ice cream, red wine or with hard boiled egg and spring onion for breakfast!

Cozonac is best enjoyed with milk, coffee, tea, ice cream, red wine…

Merry Christmas! Craciun Fericit!

What about you? What is your favorite Christmas meal?

If you decide to make cozonac using the recipe above, do send me a picture of your cozonac. I would love to post it here!

Please follow and share:
0