5 Incredible Animals Friendships Now as Story Books

animals friendsip books

If we needed more proof that animals feel empathy, these five incredible friendships between animals are the living proof and sure to melt your heart, do enjoy their story books with your child.

Human beings may be the most intelligent of all the species, but nothing beats a child’s emotional connection with a pet. So, where do animals stand when it comes to emotional intelligence?

Do animals experience emotions, do they show this by spontaneous changes in their behavior? And, as a result of the emotions they experience, do they have feelings?

The Incredible Friendship Between a BEAR, a LION and a TIGER

It was the beginning of the 21st century when three cubs were rescued from the home of a drug dealer where they were kept illegally as pets. Severely malnourished and scared, the salvation for an American Black bear cub, an African lion cub and a Bengal tiger cub came through Noah’s Ark Animal sanctuary.

This is when the cubs’ true friendship revealed itself. As the bear required an emergency operation, the lion and tiger cubs became agitated while their friend was gone. They refused food, paced their enclosure, vocalized and only stopped when the bear was safely returned to them. After this, the three cubs spent their entire time close together, clinging to one another for comfort and safety. They were named Baloo, Leo, and Shere Khan.

The bear, the lion and the tiger soon matured, yet they continued sharing the same habitat, playing, eating together and grooming one another. And they did so for 17 years. Sadly, Leo and Shere Khan passed away in 2016 and 2018 respectively, and Baloo was there for them in their final hours.

In the wild, Asian black bears and tigers do share the same territory in the Far East, but when they do meet, one of them is sure to be badly injured.

The Heartwarming Friendship Between a CHIMPANZEE and a DOG

There are quite a few cute chimps that struck lovely friendship with dogs, an undeniable proof that social connections between animals do mimic those between humans and their pets.

Often, when a chimp and a dog became friends it was the puppy who came to the baby chimp’s emotional rescue. Too many chimps are slaves of the illegal pet trade, and when they are finally rescued are found to be orphans.

What would happen, I asked myself, if a dog and a chimp met in the wild? Would they still play? Would they play fetch, perhaps? Pull faces at each other? Share naps?

The Unbelievable Friendship Between a CHEETAH and a DOG

Yes, cats and dogs can be friends. What about a wild cat and a canine? One such incredible pair were Kasi the cheetah and Mtani the Labrador. Mtani means “close friend” in Swahili.

What if the cheetah and the dog would meet in the wild, on the African planes? Would the mama-cheetah allow? Would the dog have human friends who would interfere with their unusual friendship?

The Amazing Friendship Between a LION and a DOG

A cute, brown Dachshund dog called Milo struck a remarkable friendship with a massive lion named Bonedigger when the latter became disabled due to illness. Somehow, the canine made its way to the sad lion’s heart and took the beast under his wing and the two remained the best of friends, even five years later. None of them cared that one weighs 11 pounds, while the other 500 pounds.

5 Incredible Animals Friendships Now as Story Books, the lion and the dog

Enjoy their beautiful friendship evolving throughout the seasons:

The Loving Friendship Between an ELEPHANT and a SHEEP

Albert the sheep and Themba the elephant live in Shamwari Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre in South Africa. Sadly, the elephant calf became an orphan after his mother died falling down a cliff. After a rocky start… the pair’s relationship blossomed, and they became the best of friends and Themba the elephant calf blossomed.

You can follow and enjoy their adventures in this book:

hope readers books Furstenberg
Find all my books on Amazon.

Tara, from “Gone with the Wind” to “Happy Friends”

My first dog, Tara, was one of a kind and with a name chosen from Gone With the Wind.

Do dogs grow up to mimic our appearances and personalities or do we, subconsciously, pick that one puppy who best resembles us?

When I first picked up the small, warm, brown pup, later named Tara, my first house-dog and a German Short-haired Pointer, she looked like a seal.

A seal that looks like a puppy

You know, the luscious, dark furred, round bottomed sea-creature with gleaming eyes and long whiskers. A puppy in a fur tuxedo.

I was not round-bottomed nor did I have whiskers 25 years ago. But Tara did and she also had honey-colored eyes and long ears, framing her face like well-set curls.

It’s all in the… eyebrows

Have you noticed how much a dog can communicate by just looking at you? Each facial expression, punctuated by those magical eyebrows, has a different meaning. Is a full sentence in its own right.

How they’re able to turn every situation in their favor?

So did Tara, just by using her eyebrows; bringing them together, pointing upwards, to created a vertical wrinkle between them. Or creased low over her eyes, deep in thought.

“Doing a PhD thesis on this ball in front of me. Care to help?” she’d often say…

Or by lifting them, curving them over her eyes, suddenly so big and innocent, this movement often combined with a small drop of drool in the corner of her mouth. “I trust you unconditionally to take care of my every need”, they’d say, while intentionally avoiding me.

“And I need a snack, right about now would be ideal.”

Or by just keeping her brows motionless, only her eyes rolling slowly underneath, left, right… watching me, studying me, persuading me…

“I know we did not play during the past hour. Do YOU know?”

Unconditional love

We surely mimicked each other, Tara and I, my heart joyful after hers.

She was always giving and loving, unknowingly fueling my love for animals; teaching me that unconditional love has no limits.

Tara, entering my life from Gone with the Wind to Happy Friends.

Our beloved Tara, German Shorthaired Pointer
Our beloved Tara

You might also enjoy reading about the silent dog heroes of war.

(October 2016)

On the Sunny Side of the Street with John Mahoney, Marty Crane, Frasier

Sunny Side of the Street, Marty Crane, Frasier

‘Frasier” has to be one of my all time favorite TV comedy shows, with Marty Crane and his best friend Eddie the dog (a Jack Russell Terrier) my favorite characters.

In the episode 14 of season 11, aptly titled Freudian Sleep, Marty gives us a jazzy rendition of The Sunny Side of the Street. I love this part, and Marty Crane confines in us with his life motto:

“I focus on what’s good about my life.”

Martin Crane, Frasier
On the Sunny Side of the Street, Marty Crane and Ronee Lawrence (John Mahoney and Wendie Malick)
On the Sunny Side of the Street, Marty Crane and Ronee Lawrence (John Mahoney and Wendie Malick)

On the Sunny Side of the Street with Marty Crane in Frasier

Here are the lyrics:

“Walked with no one and talked with no one
And I had nothing but shadows
Then one morning you passed
And I brightened at last
Now I greet the day and complete the day
With the sun in my heart
All my worry blew away
When you taught me how to say

Grab your coat and get your hat
Leave your worry on the doorstep
Just direct your feet
To the sunny side of the street
Can’t you hear a pitter-pat?
And that happy tune is your step
Life can be so sweet
On the sunny side of the streetI used to walk in the shade
With those blues on parade
But I’m not afraid
This Rover crossed overIf I never have a cent
I’d be rich as Rockefeller
Gold dust at my feet
On the sunny side of the street
Grab your street

Source.
Songwriters: Dorothy Fields / Jimmy McHugh
On the Sunny Side of the Street lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Universal Music Publishing Group, Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd., Shapiro Bernstein & Co. Inc.
On the Sunny Side of the Street with John Mahoney, aka Marty Crane, and Wendie Malick in Frasier. Focus on what's good about your life.
John Mahoney with talented Wendie Malick

I hope you enjoyed On the Sunny Side of the Street with talented John Mahoney as Marty Crane in Frasier. and if you found yourself humming the tune and trying a few steps of dance, even better! and, yes, Martin Crane loved the music of Frank Sinatra!

The #MusicMonday meme was created by Drew @ The Tattooed Book Geek. You can pick a song that you really like and share it on Monday. I thoroughly enjoyed this blog feature on Mischenko’s lovely blog, ReadRantRockandroll .

Look Closer. From Details to the Big Picture. What am I? Red

what am I look look closer, red

I seem to have painted myself in a corner with this look closer from details to the big picture, what am I, red. Because red is not one of my favorite colors; too much energy abundant, eye-catching assertiveness for my introvert self.

Let’s see if I can get myself out of it since I chose red because of the final image, without thinking of the implications it will have on the step by step process . Now don’t scroll to peek at it 🙂

I am thinking of those times we acted first, only to realize later that the wave has not passed. We are still to deal with the emotions our action stirred; with the physicality that, perhaps, it followed; with the energy stirred by what we did or said. That’s a face of red I see.

So, what do you see?

Look Closer From Details to the Big Picture What am I Red

Textured red, would be my first answer. Shimmering water over an agitated surface. Cardinal red that holds power. Heart braking poppy red.

A warning and questions too. Questioning myself. Self-doubt and the imperative need to take action, to prove myself to myself. Seeing red and physical need to remove myself from the situation.

Or I’d think of strawberries, if I’m hungry 🙂 Strawberries still link my mind to my childhood. A fruit of happy summer, carefree days. Heaps of them at the market. Now we get them all year round and their magic is gone.

So, I tell myself, red is not that bad after all… Post office red makes me thing of letters and of Christmas and I find this shade of bright red to be energizing.

I scroll further as I feel I’ve been staring too long at this ruby rectangle; it becomes overbearing and it pains my eyes.

Dare I zoom out?

Look Closer From Details to the Big Picture What am I Red

One extra piece of information and the image has a whole new meaning.

Red is playful now. And the illusion of shade implies light. Light is always good. Light holds answers.

I’m thinking now of bright red nail polish that carries a festive atmosphere and it always puts me in a frisky mood. Because le rouge va bien aux brunes, red suits brunettes. The one I stopped wearing long time ago.

Red’s looking better.

Perhaps the picture is that of an acorn all dressed up? I laugh and feel myself going red.

I zoom out some more.

Look Closer From Details to the Big Picture What am I Red

Oh, so it is an acorn, after all!

An acorn knitted hat.

How else would you call a beanie? A benny?

Knitted cap is too self explanatory and yet stiff. Like the set-up instructions that accompany a hammock. (Ever seen those? It goes like this: ‘insert the non-loop end into the loop on the opposite end’ – drains all the joy out of it). It should say find two trees you want to grab hold of at the same time but you can’t. Use the hammock to bridge the gap.

Same with above bonnet – too boring.

Perhaps beret, taking the French way and with a dash of WWII French Resistance…

And I am calling it a beret to lift y spirits too for I could never knit something like this. Not even the pointy bit. I can only knit in strait lines.

I did wrote a concentric letter once, though…

So we started with a textured red that looked threatening, brought in a dash of shadows and light, and a story to shake off the initial overbearing feeling.

Was it worth it?

I’ve told you I started with the final image.

Isn’t this what we always do, start with the end dream and knit our way towards it?

a cute black dog wearing a red beanie

It is always worth it, isn’t it?

Because every color has a silver lining. Red’s is unconditional love.

The Look Closer. From Details to the Big Picture. What am I? Yellow was great fun to write and sparked some discussions, in case you want to have a look.

As always, my books (all of whom have a dog knitted in the story line) are available through Amazon.

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7 Dogs That Left their Paws on History

7 dogs that left their paws on history

Today I take a break from writing fiction about dogs to take a closer look at a few canine mementos, more exactly at 7 dogs that put their paws on history – and on the reader’s hearts.

One of my all time favorite poetesses, Emily Dickinson, wrote once that ‘dogs are better than human beings because they know but do not tell,’ while Eisenhower, America’s 34th President, believed that ‘what counts is not necessarily the size of the dog in the fight; it’s the size of the fight in the dog.’

Take a moment to think of your favorite childhood story. Mine was about a sausage dog called Fridolin and chances are that, your too, was about the friendship between a man and an animal. Any parent or educator learns at some stage that the best way to convey a lesson to a child is through a story involving animals. It is based on the animal kingdom that the most valuable lessons about loyalty, trust, sacrifice and unconditional love come.

When it comes to their relationship with humans, dogs have followed a millennial, a fascinating journey that won them the nickname of man’s best friend, a path one that fed many bedtime stories for young and old alike. Furthermore, be it a puppy, a doggo or a bud, they became famous characters in literature and cinema and there are canines who have taught us powerful life lessons about what loyalty and love means. And let’s not forget the bravest hounds who helped the people in rescue operations or proved their courage on the front or behind enemy lines and even across no man’s land.

Sergeant Stubby, or when the size doesn’t matter (1916 – 1926)

Sergent Stubby, hero dog, 7 Dogs That left their Paws on History
Original caption: Washington, DC: Meet up with Stubby, a 9-year-old veteran of the canine species. He has been through the World War as mascot for the 102nd Infantry, 26th Division. Stubby visited the White House to call on President Coolidge. November 1924

Stubby certainly holds the record for receiving the most medals World War I. Stubby the puppy looked like a Pit Bull Terrier mix and was found wandering the grounds of the Yale University campus in July 1917 while members of the 102nd Infantry were training so he soon became their mascot. But Stubby also took part in numerous battles during which he helped discovering, capturing, and alerting the Allies to the presence of German spies.

Hachiko, a story of canine devotion from 1925 (1923 – 1935)

Hachiko, 7 Dogs That left their Paws on History

One day, when I will visit Japan, I will make sure to go to Shibuya train station where the statue of Hachiko is found. In Japanese culture Hachiko is a symbol of loyalty and love. This dog loved his master so much that his devotion entered people’s hearts and their memory and thus it remained in history. Books were written about him and movies were also made.

Adopted when he was just a puppy by Professor Hidesaburo Ueno, Hachiko was raised with a lot of love and attention. Since the Professor had to commute for work, Hachiko learned to wait daily for its owner’s return at Shibuya train station. The reunion of the two was the most awaited moment of the day. He did this for years until one day when Professor Ueno never returned from work. Hachiko’s owner passed away suddenly, while he was at the office, due to a cerebral hemorrhage. It was May 21, 1925. Hachiko waited until late that day, but his daddy never returned.

Yet Hachko never lost hope and for ten long years he went daily to Shibuya station to wait for his friend. Hachiko died of old age in 1935, on March 8.

What for a human being translates into basic human needs, food, comfort and love, for a dog is the definition of life itself. When men search companionship, understanding and friendship, dogs require only love.

Balto the Snowdog of 1925 (1919 – 1933)

Celebrated sled dog Balto with Gunnar Kaasen 7 Dogs That Put their Paws on History
Celebrated sled dog Balto with Gunnar Kaasen

How much do you love snow?

Balto was a Siberian husky dog trained to pull sleighs, named after the polar explorer Samuel Balto who participated in the first recorded crossing of the interior of Greenland, together with Nansen and four other expedition members.

But Balto the puppy grew into a strong and brave doggo soon known as the leader of the team that carried the diphtheria toxin in Nome, Alaska. During the winter of 1925 a small city with a big epidemic crisis was isolated due to weather conditions. The only solution to bring the antidote were dog dledding. Balto showed extraordinary courage and led the sledge to -23 ° C, at night, through the blizzard.

There is a statue in Balto’s memory in Central Park, New York. Have you seen it?

Just Nuisance, a WWII Royal Navy Able Seaman (1937 – 1944)

Just Nuisance, the hero in bestseller Joyful Trouble
Just Nuisance, the hero in my bestseller Joyful Trouble

The life and story of the legendary Great Dane, Able Seaman Just Nuisance, still captures the hearts and imagination of tourists, WWII historians and readers around the world.

Just Nuisance was born on1st April 1937 and he had a different name at the beginning, a more prosaic name. It is an extraordinary story how received the name everyone got to know him by, a story you can read in my Amazon bestseller book Joyful Trouble.

Well, I’ll share a bit. This giant Great Dane was very gentle and liked the sailors such a lot that he followed them everywhere….

‘“But mostly he liked to tail seamen, to follow them, while they were moving in and out of the naval base. Out we went, the Great Dane was after us. In the train we climbed, the dog would jump in. Even in the dockyards when we were doing our job, he was there.

He just liked to be among us, to sit among us, even lie among us and nap. Especially the ones working on the HMS Neptune,” smiled the old man.

“Was that your ship, Grandpa?”

“Yes, it was the ship I was first appointed to. She was a beautiful light cruiser! When seamen work on a ship it is always busy work, heavy work. And to get on and off the ship they lay a plank of wood a little bit wider than…. this,” and the old man kept his hands wide apart. But our Great Dane enjoyed being among the seamen so much that he thought the best place for him to sit and wait for his busy friends was the plank itself, the piece of wood connecting the ship with the shore. And you can’t blame him; that was the only area on which everyone walked; because there was no other way.

Now, that was a narrow plank and our dog was a big dog. Therefor not much space was left for the sailors to walk up and down on their duties. Every time a sailor would have to board or disembark the ship, sometimes even carrying heavy loads, he was forced to step over our four legged friend. And after a few jumps like this the seamen, no matter how fond they were of our dog, they would mumble and complain about how much trouble the dog was giving them.

And the name stuck!

Except that lots of joy was also associated with our Trouble causing friend.”

“Joyful Trouble,” said Ana to herself while watching Tommy throwing stones in the stream.’

from Joyful Trouble: Based on the True Story of a Dog Enlisted in the Royal Navy,by Patricia Furstenberg
Joyful Trouble, Based on the True Story of a Dog Enlisted in the Royal Navy

Not many know, but Just Nuisance (Joyful Trouble) also flew in planes – in secret missions.

Just Nuisance is still a big part of Simon’s Town where a statue was raised in his honor. Simon’s Town Museum in Cape Town, South Africa, also has in it’s collection Just Nuisance’s collar as well as many photographs.

Fido, a Faithful, Trusting Dog of WWII, 1943 (1941 – 1958)

7 Dogs That Left their Paws on History

A story similar to Hachiko’s became famous in Italy during World War II. The story begins when an Italian worker, Soriani, finds an injured puppy, later named Fido. Good-hearted, the man took the pup home and took good care of him. Of course, the Italian worker and and his wife quickly became attached to the cute doggo and decided to adopt him. They called him Fido (trust, faithful), cared for him and gave him all their love. They all lived in the beautiful region of Tuscani.

And Fido returned their love tenfold. Each day Fido would follow his owner to the bus station and wait for him to return. Soriani worked in a factory but at some stage during World War II, when the city was bombed, the factory was completely destroyed. Many workers died, including Soriani. For 14 years after his master’s death, Fido returned to the bus station, waiting for his return every day. Much has been written in the press of the time about this proof of devotion.

Laika, the Spacedog (1954 – 1957)

Laika, 7 Dogs That Left their Paws on History

It was 1957 and the Golden Age of Capitalism, when freedom equaled consumption in the west. But the Sovie Union had other great plans. At the control desk the engineers started the countdown, and the Sputnik 2 space shuttle was ready for launch. A brave soul, with a wet nuzzle, will soon be propelled into outer space and the history of space flight.

I don’t know about you, but I don’t like the Russian scientists of the ’50s the way I never liked the Russian soldiers of WWII. Laika was a stray wandering the streets of Moscow. She was picked up and looked after – following a devious plan. Soviet scientists chose to use Moscow strays since they assumed that such animals had already learned to endure conditions of extreme cold and hunger.

During the training time, one of the scientists involved in the project took Laika home where the dog bonded with his children. In one of the books dedicated to the puppy, the scientist said that “Laika was silent and charming.” The puppy showed a lot of courage and extraordinary intelligence throughout the entire training period.

Laika died within hours from the launch due to overheating caused by a failure when the central missile separated from the payload. The true cause and time of her death were not made public until 2002; instead, it was widely reported that she died when her oxygen ran out on day six or, as the Soviet government initially claimed, she was euthanized prior to oxygen depletion. It was only in 2008 that Russia unveiled a statue dedicated to Laika.

Apollo, the brave Silent Hero K-9 Dog of 9/11 New York (1992 – 2006)

Apollo, the brave Silent Hero K-9 Dog of 9/11 New York (1992 - 2006)

The most recent story today is that of the German shepherd Appollo, a search and rescue dog who served with the K-9 unit of the New York Police Department.

Apollo and his handler, Peter Davis, were the first K-9 search and rescue team to answer the call on September 11, arriving at the South Tower 15 minutes after its collapse. Apollo Apollo looked for survivors 18 hours a day for weeks on end. It is estimated that more than 300 dogs took part in the search, rescue and recovery efforts at Ground Zero after the 9/11 attack and Apollo was one of them. Thanks to his acute senses he helped save the victims from the rubble, sneaking in hard-to-reach places on hearing the very faint cries for help or smelling humans.

Apollo was awarded the Dickin Medal, the animals’ equivalent of the Victoria Cross, in recognition of a work well done.

Dogs are our most capable and strong friends. Cared for and loved they become our most important allies. Until then, they offer us, unconditionally, their intelligence, affection and devotion. Precious gifts!

I don’t know about you, but I wholeheartedly agree with French writer Anatole France believed (and he was correct) that ‘Until one has loved an animal a part of one’s soul remains unawakened.’

Update 🙂 because lovely Sheree commented on the old header photo: it depicts a Staff Sergeant of the Army Service Corps with the Corps pet dogs, Hissy and Jack. And we have Libby Hall, 73, press photographer and dog lover, to thank for it.