A Christmas Sneak Peek Inside my Diverse Children’s Books

The Cheetah and the Dog, The Elephant and the Sheep, The Lion and the Dog, diversity stories

This Christmas Season, have a look inside my illustrated children’s books: Joyful Trouble, Puppy, 12 Months of Rhymes and Smiles, The Cheetah and the Dog, The Elephant and the Sheep, The Lion and the Dog

Buy on Amazon Joyful Trouble by Patricia Furstenberg
Buy on Amazon Joyful Trouble by Patricia Furstenberg

Joyful Trouble

  • Kindle UK Storyteller 2017 Top Reviewed
  • When a Great Dane arrives in a Navy base nobody expects him to win everybody’s hearts, although breaking some rules along the way.
  • “A story that reads like a movie.”
  • I picked up this book intending to just read the first chapter to get a feel for it. I was utterly sucked in and I am completely in love with Joyful Trouble – what a dog!
  • Also available in LARGE PRINT
Buy on Amazon Joyful Trouble by Patricia Furstenberg, sneak peek
Buy on Amazon Joyful Trouble by Patricia Furstenberg, sneak peek
Link to Amazon: Joyful Trouble by Patricia Furstenberg, sneak peek
Link to Amazon: Joyful Trouble by Patricia Furstenberg, sneak peek
Link to Amazon: Joyful Trouble by Patricia Furstenberg, sneak peek
Link to Amazon: Joyful Trouble by Patricia Furstenberg, sneak peek
Link to Amazon: Joyful Trouble by Patricia Furstenberg
Link to Amazon: Joyful Trouble by Patricia Furstenberg
Link to Amazon: Joyful Trouble by Patricia Furstenberg
Link to Amazon: Joyful Trouble by Patricia Furstenberg

 

Puppy, 12 Months of Rhymes and Smiles
Amazon link to Puppy, 12 Months of Rhymes and Smiles

 Puppy, 12 Months of Rhymes and Smiles

  • Puppy, 12 Months of Rhymes and Smiles: is an auditory feast for children, a fun read-aloud for parents, and treat for dog-lovers, young and old.
  • If you have a dog, or you’ve ever had one, there’s no question that you’ll find yourself having a little giggle at this! Whilst clearly designed as a poetic children’s book composed of vibrant colours and illustrations which any little reader would love, it also resonates brilliantly with their adult counterparts.
  • This book is definitely aimed at younger children and will delight them as an adult reads it out loud to them. However any dog lover will also love this book and will no doubt smile as they do so.
Link to Amazon: Puppy, 12 Months of Rhymes and Smiles
Link to Amazon: Puppy, 12 Months of Rhymes and Smiles by Patricia Furstenberg
Link to Amazon: Puppy, 12 Months of Rhymes and Smiles
Link to Amazon: Puppy, 12 Months of Rhymes and Smiles by Patricia Furstenberg
Link to Amazon: Puppy, 12 Months of Rhymes and Smiles
Link to Amazon: Puppy, 12 Months of Rhymes and Smiles by Patricia Furstenberg

The Cheetah and the Dog, The Elephant and the Sheep, The Lion and the Dog

  • Link to Amazon: The Elephant and the Sheep
    Link to Amazon: The Elephant and the Sheep

    The Elephant and the Sheep: “Beautiful illustrations, a lovely message of friendship and overcoming lifes struggles and of course, as this author does so well, another fantastic story showcasing the brilliance of our furry (or not so furry!) friends.

  • Link to Amazon: The Cheetah and the Dog
    Link to Amazon: The Cheetah and the Dog

    The Cheetah and the Dog: “The moral of the story is that no matter your colour or creed, friends come in different forms and help each other. They are there for one another no matter what. The illustrations are beautiful. They are vibrant and portray the animals and their surroundings perfectly.

  • Link to Amazon: The Lion and the Dog
    Link to Amazon: The Lion and the Dog

    The Lion and the Dog: “The illustrations are bright and depict what is happening in each stage of the story. There are lots of other animals to spot in the illustrations. My daughter enjoyed pointing them out and naming them as I read the story to her. She was sad for the lion but was so pleased when the lion became friends with the dog and cheered up.

Link to Amazon: The Cheetah and the Dog, The Elephant and the Sheep, The Lion and the Dog, diversity stories
Link to Amazon: The Cheetah and the Dog, The Elephant and the Sheep, The Lion and the Dog, diversity stories by Patricia Furstenberg
Link to Amazon: The Lion and the Dog by Patricia Furstenberg
Link to Amazon: The Lion and the Dog by Patricia Furstenberg
Link to Amazon: The Elephant and the Sheep by Patricia Furstenberg
Link to Amazon: The Elephant and the Sheep by Patricia Furstenberg
Link to Amazon: The Cheetah and the Dog by Patricia Furstenberg
Link to Amazon: The Cheetah and the Dog by Patricia Furstenberg

 

Link to Amazon: The Cheetah and the Dog, The Elephant and the Sheep, The Lion and the Dog, diversity stories
Link to Amazon: The Cheetah and the Dog, The Elephant and the Sheep, The Lion and the Dog, diversity stories

Find ALL my eBooks, paperback books and large print paperback editions on Amazon:

Amazon US, Author Patricia Furstenberg

Amazon UK, Author Patricia Furstenberg

Amazon Deutschland, Author Patricia Furstenberg

Amazon Japan, Author Patricia Furstenberg

 

 

 

 

Follow this blog:
error

April Fool’s Day, Childish Mischief or Ingenious Merriment?

April Fools' Day
April Fools' Day
April Fools’ Day

 April Fool’s Day, Childish Mischief or Ingenious Merriment?

All Fools’ Day or April Fool’s is an ancient celebration with universal roots. A day perceived as cheerful and mischievous, childish and absurd, its appeal to the human sense of humor and intellect is what probably made it last throughout the years. Or perhaps that breaking down the general barriers for just one day and shining a different light on life is just the tonic humanity needs, thinks sociologist Jonathan Wynn.

 April Fool’s origin

2000 years ago Romans celebrated Hilaria (Latin for “happiness”) at the end of March, a day of fun and nonsense when people would dress up in disguises. The Northern Hemisphere displays unpredictable weather during this time of the year, playing tricks on people so here’s another speculation for April 1st as for centuries humanity took their cues from and looked for answers in nature. Around the same time Hindus celebrate Holi, the Festival of Color, one of the few non-religious Hindu celebrations of merrymaking and generally “letting loose”. The Jewish Purim, a lively and fun festival, is also celebrated mid-March. Surprising how this time of the year brings merriment and well-being all around the world!

Another explanation for April Fool’s is that during the reign of Roman Emperor Constantine a group of court jesters proclaimed that they will be able to do a better job at running the empire than he did. In those times court fools were wise people, held in high regard. So Constantine played, along allowing Kugel the Jester to be king for one day. Kugel used his power wisely and proclaimed that day one of absurdity and trickery, thus putting life into a different light. His edict pleased the masses and it became an annual event – says BU Emertius Professor of History Joseph Boskin in this interview.

Professor Boskin actually prancked the American public with this story on April 1st 1983.

April’s Fools Practices around the World

In Scotland people are being sent in a “fool’s errand”, “hunting the gowk” usually with a sealed message reading

“Dinna laugh, dinna smile. Hunt the gowk another mile”.

The poor messenger is being sent from person to person becoming the gawk, a word used for cuckoo bird which symbolizes the fool.

In UK the prank is only being pulled by midday, the person playing the prank after that becoming the April Fools himself.

In Italy, France, Belgium, The Netherlands or French speaking nations around the world this day is called Poisson d’Avril, rooted in the 16th century with its change from the Julian calendar to the Gregorian calendar. A paper fish is placed on people’s back symbolizing an easy catch, a gullible person.

Did you know?

Sugrophobia is the “fear of being suckered, tricked”, from “sugro” Latin for “to suck”.

Do’s and Don’ts on April Fool’s

Do plan ahead

Do help your little ones if they want to plan a prank but use your common sense

Do know the chemical substances you want to use

Do keep your hoax within moral limits

Do tell it’s an April Fool’s hoax as soon as you’re being asked

Do team up with your office mates

Do have fun and, remember, what goes around comes around

Don’t play the joke on your little children or your pets

Don’t resign as a joke

Don’t let a prank carry on for too long. It’s only fun if everybody is having fun.

Don’t experiment with potentially hazardous substances

Five of the best April Fool’s Hoaxes in history

  1. Prank Robbery, South Africa, 1952
    Four masked men entered a Stellenbosch bank and aimed water pistols at the staff shouting, “This is a holdup. Hand over the cash!” The alarm went off and the men threw the cash back, shouting “April Fool” then fled the scene in a car.
  2. Spaghetti Harvest, UK, 1957
    BBC broadcasted a three-minute segment featured a family from Switzerland carrying out their annual spaghetti harvest, picking strands of spaghetti from a tree and laying them in the sun to dry. Time was of essence as a sudden change in weather could impact on the flavor of the spaghetti. This was 1957 when spaghetti was still an exotic delicacy in UK. Some viewers called in asking where they could get their own spaghetti bushes.
  3. A new island in the Indian Ocean, UK, 1977
    The British newspaper The Guardian runs a special seven-page report about a newly discovered nation in a remote part of the Indian Ocean called San Serriffe, with the capital Bodoni and ruled by General Pica. The republic’s two main islands are named Upper Caisse and Lower Caisse and on an aerial view they look just like a semi-colon. The hoax was a huge success, with only a few people spotting that all the terminology was named after printers’ lingo.
  4. Google Translate for Animals, 2000
    In 2000 Google claimed they had come up with a new app called Google Translate for Animals. The app could decipher what your pet was barking, mewing, grunting or cheeping about. It also supplied a video that has been seen nearly 2 million times.
  5. Water Runways for airplanes, South Africa, 2012
    Kulula Airline announces that selected airports, Cape Town, Durban and soon, Hartebeespoort Dam in Gauteng will soon be operating water runways in an attempt to “curb rising airport traffic congestion and high airport taxes.” The departing gate will now be called a departing pier and instead of buses, the passengers will be ferried to the planes by water shuttles.
Follow this blog:
error

Spilling The Beans: Why #PayWithAPoem Day Is For Everyone

The Poet-Tree, Robert Montgomery
The Poet-Tree, Robert Montgomery
The Poet-Tree, Robert Montgomery

Spilling The Beans: Why #PayWithAPoem Day Is For Everyone

Take me to Croatia on the 21st of March! I only need 12 hours. I need this time to feed my soul and my body; poetry for the soul, coffee for the body. And if not Croatia, then fly me to Turkey, UK or Romania!

On this day only one can pay with a poem for one’s cup of coffee.

Would you do it?

Did you know that one in five people believe poetry is for professional writers only?

Poetry excites the mind and enlightens the soul. You could say: “Whoa, Babe, poetry ahead!” or “Yay! Poetry!” Either way your eye acknowledged it and your mind engaged with it and your heart, most probably, slowed down its pace. “I know this”, it pulsed. “It is my language.” Because poetry is the universal language of our hearts.

Pay With A Poem Day is a fresh, new approach on literature. In 1999 UNESCO (the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) declared March 21 World Poetry Day, celebrating writing, publishing, reading and teaching of poetry worldwide, as UNESCO says, to give fresh recognition and impetus to national, regional and international poetry movements.

Pay With A Poem Day has been initiated in 2013 by the Viennese manufacturer and coffee retailer Julius Meinl and all participating coffee sites are supported by a global campaign. If not lucky enough to be in a participating country on the 21st of March, you can follow it on Facebook and Twitter, using the hashtags #PayWithAPoem and #PoetryForChange.

In 2016 over 250 cafes around Croatia gave FREE coffee in exchange for a… poem, 34 countries from around the world, 1 300 coffee houses where over 100 000 poems have been written! This year four continents will be joining in this brewing frenzy – with Netherlands and Singapore taking part for the first time.

From a bartering point of view, does this mean that a poem is worth a cup of coffee? If so, then I would definitely like to know how many cups of coffee is Karen Blixen’s Our Of Africa worth. How about Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None? Christie was a teetotaler. How many tea cups had she consumed until its completion? 500? 1,000?

How about Farewell To Arms?

Pay With A Poem Day does put book prices in a different perspective. And considering just the coffee price today, picking up a book at your local bookstore suddenly seems like a bargain.

Feeling uneasy about that poem? Two genres of short poetry come to mind for this fantastic occasion.

  • Write a Haiku.

Traditionally Japanese a Haiku is a 17 syllables verse formed of three lines with 5-7-5 syllables. Usually a Haiku is inspired by nature. Keep it short and count your syllables.

  • Write poetry of your own heart.

Just put pen on paper smile and listen to your heartbeat.

What Coffee is to Poetry by Patricia Furstenberg

Coffee is brewed for all of my sense,

Hot, steamy like a heart

Pulsating into my cup.

Nurturing me,

Giving me life

Day in and day out.

Poetry grows like a tree of life,

Words covering the nakedness of its trunk.

Cover my heart,

Fuel my emotions.

Coffee and poetry

For eternity.

Pay With A Poem Day around the world

London

A visual image for #PayWithAPoem day is The PoeTree. A red tree trunk with leafs of poems written all over the world on this singular day and planted right in the heart of London, on the pavement on Finsbury Avenue Square.

“We need poetry as much as we need nature. We need it to repopulate the places devoid of emotion with our dreams and our imagination. Poems can change our days for the better. They did it on March 21st. They are doing it now, once again.” (Robert Montgomery, Pay With A Poem global ambassador and artist.)

Milan

A bridge over Navigli River is draped in poems and thoughts written by coffee lovers. Imagine strolling under the Italian sun, taking in the sights and sounds of history, your heartbeat slowing down. The fresh aroma of coffee rises teasingly when a gush of wind makes the bridge hum, a low hum of paper being tossed and turned like the pages of an open book, spread out, invitingly waiting for you. Go ahead, read it, it’s ok, it is La Dolce Vita.

Lucchetti? …no grazie, POESIE!#poesia#emozioni#pontenaviglio#Milano#paywithapoemhttps://t.co/kzqg4oIQHApic.twitter.com/Ln7YxlCvTT

— Patrizia Franzina (@LaPatty1) May 4, 2016

Because POETRY is for EVERYONE.

It is as much mine and yours as it is Shelley’s or Frost’s. POETRY is not a past tense, poetry is NOW, contemporary and ALIVE.

“I love how Pay With A Poem provides a little pocket of freedom, where money is replaced by poetry. Instead of using a banknote or a credit card people can transfer value to poetry, and use it as an alternative form of payment.” (Robert Montgomery)

There’s more to look forward to as Julius Meinl also initiated the Meet With A Poem campaign on the 1st of October:

“An experiment to rewrite the way we show our feelings”

Just go ahead, put your heart on paper and write that poem. I know I will.

This article was written for and initially published on the Huffington Post SA on 21st March 2017.

Huffington Post SA
HuffPostSA
Follow this blog:
error

Waiting for Snow

Waiting for Snow Image courtesy Unsplash

Waiting for Snow

Waiting for Snow Image courtesy Unsplash
Waiting for Snow
Image courtesy Unsplash

Dad cheerful said: “We’ll have Snow tomorrow!”

So my human pup and I, brave Eskimos,

Early before breakfast went down below

And sat by the window, waiting for snow.

 

It must be someone special, went through my head,

Since we could, this morning, and quite by chance,

Not eat at the table. “Toast! Can I have some more?”

“On one condition: not a crumb on the floor!”

 

I’m looking left, towards the deep, dark woods.

I’m looking right, towards the town with goods.

Where will she come from, Mrs. Snow?

Will she take the bus? Will she arrive by noon?

 

There’s a little bus station right by our house,

It’s busy in the morning, you couldn’t spot a mouse.

Buses stop here often throughout the day.

But Snow doesn’t get off. What’s causing her delay?

 

Maybe she’ll ride a bicycle, red and bright and shiny.

Like the postman does each day, even when it’s rainy.

Maybe she’ll come by yellow taxi, honking any minute.

Like the doctor does; arriving in an instant.

 

But what if Snow will just walk here, like grandpa likes to do.

“Exercise is good for you, I’m never sick with flue!”

He always tells my human pup and winks at her some more.

Grandpa’s old and wrinkled; his exercise advice might work!

 

What if Snow arrives at tea time? Mom always sais to us:

“It’s fashionable to do so, but always come announced!”

Aunts and quite so many Ladies visit once a week.

And tea, cookies and cakes, so yummy, they always like to eat.

 

Who is this Snow? Nobody mentioned her before!

Why is she coming? Did Mom even agreed?

My human pup expects her to play games;

I just want to know: will she throws sticks, twice in a row?

 

Will she tell bedtime stories and like pups like me?

Is she a stern or friendly Lady? I guess I’ll have to wait and see.

Will she share crumbs? And mostly,

Where will she sleep, if feeling lonely?

 

It’s way past lunch, we waited for sooo long.

My human pup is restless, Mom even hums a song.

I’ll tell Snow, when I’ll meet her, whenever that will be,

That being late is a no-no, please Ma’am, excuse me.

 

She didn’t come at all and it’s already time for bed.

Pajamas on, the story read, my human pup still sad.

“She’s here!” shouts Mom, so excited. “Hurry, get dressed!”

Get dressed? Go OUT? Why everyone’s so restless?

 

Is Snow a President?  What do I say, maybe she’s the Queen!

For all I know, from what I’ve seen, she’s a most expected being!

I won’t mention being late, but offer her some tea.

I only hope she brings presents, a little bone for me?

 

by Patricia Furstenberg

This is an edited version of the poem initially written for mypuppyclub.net

 

Follow this blog:
error